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Most primers are sealers also. Primers generally stick to the substrate (wood) better than most finishes and most finishes stick to the primer better than the substrate. A sealer doesn't do much of what the name implies. What a sealer is designed to do is to raise the grain and seal the wood from raising the grain again. Anyway, that is what I was taught 40 years ago and I do realize that things do change over time. Today, most pre-finishes are primer-sealers combined.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I have to say guys. The info I have got from you all is amazing. Thank you so much for the help. I’ve been Googling all this new stuff for a few day now and getting a much better idea of what to do.

@Quickstep thanks for the Color advice. I’ve been looking at some die from a U.K. company called northwest guitars. The similar water based to the ones you recommend. I maybe go for amber and orange and try the run down technique you mention. I’ll also use the timbermate for the voids.


@Tony B is there a particular sanding sealer you can recommend? I was looking at this one:


The process follow seems to be:
  1. Fill with timbermate
  2. Stain colour 1
  3. Gentle sandback
  4. Stain colour 2
  5. Gentle sandback
  6. Sanding sealer?
  7. Flatten sanding sealer
  8. Wipe on poly (I’m scared to mess up other finishes or spray ones, so wipe on seems doable for a newby.
  9. Polish.
 

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Here’s a place in the UK that sells Liberon dyes. Liberon is a well respected brand. If you do the two step process, I prefer water based for the first color and spirit based for the second color.

 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I might just do the postage actually. It going to make a huge difference to the final result. Maybe I can get a load of bits and weight out the cost of membership.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Here’s a place in the UK that sells Liberon dyes. Liberon is a well respected brand. If you do the two step process, I prefer water based for the first color and spirit based for the second color.

oh that’s great @Quickstep. These arequite easy to find in the U.K. their floor of range has some nice wood tones too!

Many thanks
 

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@LongJonLeBon
Sorry I cant help you on the primer. I only use lacquer and the primers for lacquer are very specific to lacquer.
Usually your finish instructions will tell you what you can or cant use. It is best to stay with the same manufacturer. If you have a problem with the finish, one manufacturer usually wont give any assistance if your problem involves another manufacturers product somewhere in the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Just taking a flyer here, but you might want to take a trip to Denmark Street and see if there’s someone who could spray it for you.
Yeah! That’s what I thought at first. I did my work experience aged 15 in Denmark street many moons ago so love the place with a passion.

As shopping online became a think I would always go back to Denmark street to give the real stores my business (although all but 2 were owned by the same guy and had been since the 80s). They would always price match the online price, so all good.

This time around I phoned a few with a long list of bits for a partscaster or two I’m building and they actually sounded a bit annoyed that they had to check the stock and then seemed to have nothing but over priced big name guitars in there. I phoned 4 store and they all said to buy the bits online.

There are a few luthiers there, but none with space to spray centrally. They send out to the next county.

…so I thought I’m going to do it myself…and learn load…and probs mess it up a bit…but have some fun and do something new.
 

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I’d suggest you get sanding sealer or shellac on a spray can. With the dye it’s kind of important not to wipe on the first coat as it can smear the dye around making it streaky.

Actually, lacquer is available in a spray can as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Agreed! I was thinking that would also work as a grain filler too. I’ll fill the holes and die, and then a clear sanding sealer. Maybe poly on top of that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
So I’ve been making some progress. It seems timbermate isn’t in the U.K, but Famowood seems similar. Used it to fill the larger voids.

I got some stain from a uk company called crimson guitars. Also got some gold grain filler (well…why not).

I’ve sanded to 240, stained, grain filled, knocked it back and stained again. Now it looks like this:

Musical instrument Guitar Guitar accessory Wood String instrument accessory


Really happy considering i didn’t know my grain filler from my sanding sealer a few weeks ago.

Massive thanks for all the advice here guys!!

Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I got some wipe on lacquer from the crimson guitar place. Apparently will build up to a glossy shine.

When this stain drys it’s a built duller. I’m hoping it looks like it does wet after the lacquer.

Is there a way to keep the wet look?
 

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Is there a way to keep the wet look?
Wet sand with 320/400/600 and maybe to 1000/1200 depending on your taste for what you see. It'll require polishing with lambs wool buffer and something like Meguiar's to get that wet look sheen. The more you go to finer grits wet sanding the less polishing you'll have to do with the lambs wool.

The guitar looks fantastic, btw!!
 

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Wet sand with 320/400/600 and maybe to 1000/1200 depending on your taste for what you see. It'll require polishing with lambs wool buffer and something like Meguiar's to get that wet look sheen. The more you go to finer grits wet sanding the less polishing you'll have to do with the lambs wool.

The guitar looks fantastic, btw!!
David, I don’t think he’s put any topcoat on yet. I mention this since wet sanding at this point could mess things up.
 
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