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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a wood slab a month ago which has a persistent strong odor from the finish. It's not particularly unpleasant, but I'm concerned about the odors off gassing once I bring it in my house. I've tried exposing the wood to a fan for long periods of time, bring it outside in the sun, and keeping it exposed to outdoor space as much as possible. Unfortunately, the odor persists. The reportable volatile HAP in the finish include: Toluene (10% level vol.), M-xylene (0.69% level vol), Ethylbenzene (0.39%), O-xylene (0.28%), P-xylene (0.18%) and formaldehyde (0.09%). I don't know that other ingredients are in the finish.

Does anybody have any informed input regarding:
1) whether there is a health risk if one is exposed to this odor for prolonged periods of time. I'm debating just bringing it in the house and using the piece as intended (desk-top).
2) how much longer should i expect to smell the odor?
3) any other tips to eliminate the odor/expedite offgassing?
4) any odorless transparent finishes that can be applied over this to "lock-in" the smell?

Thanks for reviewing and for your input.
 

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About all you could do is put a fan on it. The more air that is circulated the faster it will stop off gassing.
 

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welcome to the forum.
you purchased the slab already finished ?
is there a way you can find out the name brand of the product that was used ?
.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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If this finish is a pre-cat lacquer and was applied correctly, the question in my mind is how long ago was the finish applied? It should have cured rather quickly and the odor should have dissipated in a week or so. At this point, if the finish is hardened (can’t stick your fingernail into it), there is nothing to do except what Steve suggested. If the finish hasn’t fully hardened by now, I’d be concerned it won’t for a very long time. As for overcoating this finish, a lacquer can be top coated, but it must be fully cured (I.e. no smell) and well scuffed before top coating. I’d go back to whomever applied the finish for guidance.
 
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