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Discussion Starter #1
I have a dilemma and am looking for suggestions. As you can see from the pic I have a rounded and tapered piece of walnut that I need to cut in half. And I half means along the whole length of the piece. It is 2" thick at the widest point and about 3/4" at the ends. I have a band saw that I was going to use, but don't want to just free hand it. Since it tapers, I really don't see how to use a fence here either. So, if you've done this before, I'd like to hear some suggestions.

Thx


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I have not done this, but use some pieces of scrap and a sacrificial board to ride against the fence.

Cut a piece of scrap to fit under each end as saddles. Likely need some manual tweaking to fit. Glue these to the sacrificial board. Make these so the widest part rests on the sacrificial board.

You can then just run the board with the tapered piece resting on the two saddles down the fence.
 

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I would have ripped it before I turned it, then glued a piece of paper (usually use a paper bag or similar) to one piece, and then glue the pieces back together. Turn the piece and then separate. I've turned half and quarter columns like this, works very well.
 

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If the bottom will not be visible, I would screw a squared piece of plywood to the bottom, centered as required and run it through the table saw.
If the bottom will be visible, a few 'dots' with a hot glue gun to a piece of plywood, run it through a table saw and ice to help break it loose
 

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I would use 2 strips of wood running the length of your piece and put one strip on each side and either hot glue or sticky tape them in place. The 2 strips will hold the piece steady to prevent rotation and will provide a straight base to run along the table. If you look at a cross section of the turning with the wood strips attached, it will look like a tie fighter. |o|
 

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I would use 2 strips of wood running the length of your piece and put one strip on each side and either hot glue or sticky tape them in place. The 2 strips will hold the piece steady to prevent rotation and will provide a straight base to run along the table.

If you look at a cross section of the turning with the wood strips attached, it will look like a tie fighter. |o|
 

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Use theI would make a v cradle for each end, then attach the two v's together about 1/3 the distance of the turning apart. Use the bandsaw to make the cut and cut right through the cradle as you go
 

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I've done this by hot glueing the piece to a carrier board, as others have mentioned. It works well with a band saw since most of the force on the piece is downward. It's a little trickier on a table saw since there may be a lot more longitudinal force stressing the glue joint.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the suggestions. I build a sled with a v in it to hold the spindle. Worked great. Next time I'll do as Proctor suggested.

Here is the finished project.



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