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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,
I'm about to open a business to work in antique furniture restoration, on a space with 1000 square feet. Since sometimes I use toxic chemicals for re-finishing pieces I need to install a ventilation booth type in a corner to exhaust the toxic vapors out and up towards the roof. The professional exhaust ventilation systems are incredibly expensive and it would be a crazy investment for now. Does anyone have a cheap idea of how could a make this work in a way to follow safety procedures and avoid the vapors to get in the rest of the room? I also thought of the plastic type spray booth but not sure if the vapors will be properly retained inside the booth.

Thanks for any thoughts ...

Miguel
 

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Research,research,research............using a hillbilly(I are one,and use the term in a positive manner)spraybooth in a bonafide business environ is opening your shop up to the wrath of all those in charge.Read that OSHA,EPA,and any other guv. org. looking for easy money.So,yes there are ways to build your own and will go on to say you can build one that quite possibly is engineered better than "store bought".It ain't gonna be easy and it probably won't be cheap.

Finding a sympathetic ear in the auto paint resto crowd in your area will go a LONG way in your education process.What goes on here in the mnts. of Va. is a heck of alot diff. from regs in L.A.or N.J.....this is why you need local input.

The folks involved with fire regs have always been a better,friendly'er resourse than OSHA.To the point that the latter has becomea joke within the community(paint world).Google up the national fire & safety codes.....talk to the local fire chief.Talk to a REAL paint distributor,who if you're smart will be buying products from.His knowlege base is indespensible when first starting out,especailly in these areas(fire,fumes).BW
 
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You will be surprised how cheap you can find spray booths at auction or on craigslist. Of course it seems like it's hard to find those great deals when you are actually in need of a particular item.

Being that you only have 1000 square feet, are you looking to have a completely enclosed spray booth or one with modular walls that can be easily assembled/disassembled or do you just want some kind of exhaust fan in your wall that will suck out some of the vapors?

I agree with the above post that building one that will meet osha standards will probably be more expensive than buying a used setup but we would all be lying if we told you at some point we haven't improvised with an exhaust fan and a couple of furnace filters. That being said, if finishing is going to be your livelihood, you should do yourself a favor and start looking for a good used spray booth. Not only for health and safety but because it will improve the quality of your finish.
 

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Yes,buy used........you can't get the materials for what they sell for used.


Regarding OSHA,and like all info on web.....well intentioned or not.....research it for yourself;If OP is a "sole proprieter".No employee biz,I don't think OSHA has any interest in him.And this is a fine gray area.But that don't matter,fire and personal safety/comfort is in my pea brain of the utmost importance......so getting that little "approved" sticker or tag on a store bought spray booth is still a smart biz move.BW
 
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where's my table saw?
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Good advice above

Having done some refinishing myself and spraying of lacquer based finishes you have 2 issues, explosive vapors and airborne particles, neither of which are good for your health and one of which can blow up your shop. :eek::thumbdown::yes:
The explosive vapors from thinners and solvents, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichloromethane are a short term problem, (can kill you instantly) while breathing the airborne stuff will kill you over time.
Don't take any chances with home made systems with non explosion proof motors in the airstream. They're OK for air flitration of dust particles, but not vapors. Some of the commercial spray booths use a water fall to catch the particles, other use a large filter bank.
When ever I've had to use high volatility thinners I try to work outside, but it's not easy in Michigan winters. A refinishing business or restoration business will be a year round affair, not seasonal, so you need to account for that. JMO ;) bill

Grizzly has some CHEAP! http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2010/Main/180
 
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Discussion Starter #6
hi guys
thank u all for your input.
In fact there are two basic options, of using an exhaustion of fumes towards outside the building, or using a fumes collector with carbon activated filters, but this one would get quickly expensive as the filters would get saturated fast, forcing me to replace them every month. Looks like the filters are expensive.
Also, I was taught that since there are residential apartments above this studio, I can't really use any toxic components that are flammable of any kind, and the space doesn't have sprinklers in the roof, also, so they cut my legs right there. Fire department would reprove inspection right there and so as City Hall. But they dont understand that this use ownt be like an industrial use, dealing with gallons of chemicals at the same time, but in fact only with small jars. I can even go for waterborne finishes but the only issue is that some clients want traditional finishes (shellac, resin varnishes) and then toxic solvents are present again.
Guess i have to bring back home the toxic work to the garage, and have just the "clean air work" in the new studio.
as soon as i get my studio done i'll be glad to tell the correct location so u guys can step by for a visit or even for the open doors :)

Thanks
M
 

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A spray booth setup can be (and usually is) an expensive step in finishing. It's not only the feds, but all the locals jump in on the codes. No matter how "legal" you make it, if someone complains, it comes back to you.

Spray booths can be closely set up for your needs. That's one area that cutting corners can be hazardous. Along with getting the draft, and clean air intake, and filtered air out, you will likely have to have a fire suppressant system, which can be in itself an involved system. Some areas require it to be linked to the fire dept.

Do yourself a favor and get all the details before spending any money. If you set up a DIY booth, keep in mind that you are liable for its use.










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where's my table saw?
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Do yourself a favor and get all the details before spending any money. If you set up a DIY booth, keep in mind that you are liable for its use. .......
Yeah, and we all told you not to do it! But you wouldn't listen and we are not responsible in any way.....:eek: bill
 
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