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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I had this all figured out - fortunately I did some dry fitting/assembly before beginning glue-up - found out I don't have it all figured out.

See attached. Back side of router table fence I'm making. I can't figure out how to clamp the four 90 degree reinforcement blocks in place for gluing. Everything I try with the clamps I have, they slip off.

What's the secret?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
+1. :yes: You can just shoot a brad nail or staple to hold them in place so you can countersink/pilot a screw hole.










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I've thought of a screw if I could hold the block in place while drilling/inserting screw. I'm a little reluctant to staple since my last such effort resulted in splitting the mdf block. Is there a secret to stapling mdf with out splitting it (during that last effort I did try and staple from the edge of the block to the surface of the adjoining mdf - maybe come from the other side?)?
 

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See attached. Back side of router table fence I'm making. I can't figure out how to clamp the four 90 degree reinforcement blocks in place for gluing. Everything I try with the clamps I have, they slip off.

What's the secret?
If the reinforcement blocks are a good fit, then you should be able to glue without clamps.

a) Use CA glue (aka super glue) and hold in place until it sets, or get the accelerator and it will set instantly.

b) Use e.g., Titebond I and squish the piece in place, wiggle slightly side to side. You will soon feel friction as the glue starts to hold. This works as long as there is no pressure on the block until after the glue has set.

I have read of a hybrid of these methods where a drop of CA glue is applied on the tip, then Titebond to the remainder - keeping out of the CA area, then use the accelerator to get the CA to hold while the Titebond sets. Seems too much effort for me. I would use a) or b).
 

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Since your 90° block backs are angled your clamps will slip off. A remedy is to use the cutoffs from those, or make other angled blocks to match those so you'll have a flat surface to clamp. No glue is required on them, it's just for glue up.

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
 

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Thought I had this all figured out - fortunately I did some dry fitting/assembly before beginning glue-up - found out I don't have it all figured out.

See attached. Back side of router table fence I'm making. I can't figure out how to clamp the four 90 degree reinforcement blocks in place for gluing. Everything I try with the clamps I have, they slip off.

What's the secret?
one thing on the fence , how are you going to use a flush trim bit ? you need 1/8" difference on the out feed table ? that is what the bit take's off , if the off set isn't done the wood it will just hit the edge of the out feed fence ? other cuts will work, some may not , You should have a splite fence ? for some job's, you may want to make another one, if you are going to use a flush trim bit for glueing up, this bit is used like a joinger , it face's the board on the edge so when you put 2 boards togother no light so a good fit, here is a web site for router and ect, i been a menber for yrs, lot's of good info their http://www.routerforums.com/ i guess i didn't give you any input on keeping the board's in place, pin nail is the best don't need much just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
one thing on the fence , how are you going to use a flush trim bit ? you need 1/8" difference on the out feed table ? that is what the bit take's off , if the off set isn't done the wood it will just hit the edge of the out feed fence ? other cuts will work, some may not , You should have a splite fence ? for some job's, you may want to make another one, if you are going to use a flush trim bit for glueing up, this bit is used like a joinger , it face's the board on the edge so when you put 2 boards togother no light so a good fit, here is a web site for router and ect, i been a menber for yrs, lot's of good info their http://www.routerforums.com/ i guess i didn't give you any input on keeping the board's in place, pin nail is the best don't need much just my 2 cents
This (the photo) will be one part of a three part fence (the New Yankee Workshop design). Two split fence components will be "T" bolted to the front - will allow inserting the Rockler jointer shims behind the outfeed section.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here's what I did. I liked the idea of wedges - unfortunately the cut-off pieces were used for making additional braces. Also, I rounded the edges of the braces (per Norm), so just a plain wedge would not be stable.

So, I took a piece of scrap 2x2 and cut a 3/4" dado, about 1/2" deep. Cut wedges. Put a piece of adhesive back sandpaper in the groove of each wedge and clamped the braces up. Worked great.

Thanks for input.
 

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Glad it worked. I wouldn't of thought of putting the dado in it. great job!

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
 
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