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Newbie question. Hoping to get into musical instrument building and I would want a dehumidifier for my garage shop. How do I select one that will do the job? I assume square footage and ceiling height must be considered... I've never owned or used a dehumidifier.

Thanks, all!

Chuck Barnett
Arlington, WA
 

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Dehumidifiers are sold with a specification on the maximum amount of water which they can remove from the air in a 24 hour period.

This does NOT mean the container will hold this amount of water. Hence if you do not connect the container to a drain, you will need to monitor when the container is full. The units shut off when the container is full.

My original dehumidifier purchased decades ago gave me good service, but it was noisy. The replacements did not last long, sad to say.

I now have a Danby Premiere 50 pint / day dehumidifier. Quiet, works well and I am hoping for long service. So far 3+ years.

This is in the lower section of my raised ranch house, which is about 2100 sq ft. I am able to maintain my desired humidity which is about 60%. I am just wanting to prevent mold and the dampness which would exist without the dehumidifier.

I only run this in the late spring to late fall.

I do not connect the container to a drain. I could do so, but when I had this setup the dust etc would build up in the drain line over time. Also can build up mold, since the container will be humid, but no water level.

I now prefer to just empty the container when it is full. I spray with Chlorox now and again to prevent mold in the container.
 

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Notice much of an impact on your electric bill when you run it, Dave?

I live in FL so I have to deal with humidity issues. My painted cement floor was drenched like a hose went off a couple weeks ago. Cast iron tops got a nice heavy coat of rust that night.
 

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Dehumidifiers are as pointed out, based on a capability to remove moisture. So the idea many have is that I'll hook it to a hose so I'm going to buy the smallest one is flawed, it will even when hooked to a hose only remove the stated capacity in 24 hours. Dehumidifiers unlike ac units, can not be purchased too large. If you buy too large of one, it will run less. That said in a humid garage, I doubt you can buy too large of one.

I've owned quite a few, as most are built like crap Today. I'd recommend the frigidare Fad704dwd as the unit for you. Amazon has them for 237, and best buy for 279, but best but will match the amazon price if you print off the page and take it in.
 

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Oh and opposite Dave's recommendation, I prefer the drain hose as during humid weather most units have the capability to fill the buckets 2-3 times a day.

When you get one, don't forget to clean the filter monthly or more if used in the shop.
 

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If it matters for you; not all dehumidifies will work in cold conditions. I have a whirlpool model that worked great in my basement but was useless in my garage because it would ice up if the temp was under about 65. Frigidaire makes low temp models, but doesn't seem to advertise that fact well. I had to dig for a while to find documentation saying that the model I have (fad504dwd) is good to as low as 41 degrees. It's great for dealing with the snow melt off the cars in winter. I can keep the garage dry without having to heat it to 70 degrees.
 

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Very good point...but he lives in Florida so we can all just be mad he doesn't deal with snow!!!
 

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OP lives in Washington. I'm the lucky guy that doesn't have to deal with snow, but I get incredibly high and humid temps, hurricanes, and a few tornadoes peppered in there.
 
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