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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Nice. Thank you.
If you're buying a mill then look at the trailer mounted models, I run a tk 1400 and I love it. You still have to remember to bring all your tools and extra blades and everything you need no matter what, as a general rule I forget at least one thing every time I haul the mill somewhere, fortunately most of my work is for friends and family. I've seen people with the ground models set up on a lowboy, which I guess works too, but seems like it would be more trouble than its worth if you're buying new. The other major things to consider is whether a clients tree is truly accessible, or limbed, or even worth milling. And to me the hardest part is trying to get people to understand what it takes to actually stack and dry the lumber to make it usable, but that could change depending on your area, I'm in a highly urban area and people always seem surprised you can even cut your own lumber so the have no clue about drying. Break down and set up is fairly simple for the models made to travel, mine is simply adjusting the outriggers until the deck is level, usually takes 15 minutes or so all together, I take the water tank down when on the road but you can always just strap it down which is 2 minutes to set up, and mine has ramps for parbuckling whereas others may have hydraulic log lifters so that just depends on your model. Cleanup can depend on how big of a job you do and where its at, in the middle of nowhere its fine leaving a giant pile of sawdust, but in somebody's yard I like to keep dust gathered as much as possible and blow everything down with a leaf blower when I'm done.
Thank you for that detail. I'm in a rather urban area, too. I like that it doesn't take much time to set up/ break down.
 
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