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Ditto on that, true quartersawn wood will always have grain running perpendicular to face.
I really believe that the designation has to be viewed on a spectrum running from absolute 90-degree vertical grain at one end and absolute tangent-ring flat sawn at the other.

"Quartersawn" would refer to some range near the 90-degree end. Would we call a board with grain at 85 degrees quartersawn? I would. 80 degrees?

I've used quite a lot of quartersawn wood in projects over the years, but have rarely bought it under that moniker. Flatsawn boards cut through or near the center of the log can have quite a bit of vertical or near-vertical grain wood.
 

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bzguy
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I really believe that the designation has to be viewed on a spectrum running from absolute 90-degree vertical grain at one end and absolute tangent-ring flat sawn at the other.

"Quartersawn" would refer to some range near the 90-degree end. Would we call a board with grain at 85 degrees quartersawn? I would. 80 degrees?

I've used quite a lot of quartersawn wood in projects over the years, but have rarely bought it under that moniker. Flatsawn boards cut through or near the center of the log can have quite a bit of vertical or near-vertical grain wood.
I agree that slightly off 90 degrees will work, however....
The guy remarked about arguments about the term quartersawn.
In the old days sawyers used to "quarter" the log, like in the illustration in second link.
If you look, it's all marked out to be sawed "radially".
This is the only way to get perpendicular, authentic quartersawn wood.
Anything else is technically rift or flat sawn.
Even when you flat saw, you will wind up with a center quartersawn piece of wood.
This is the wood you sometimes buy that isn't marketed as quartersawn.
 

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A plank cut through the log with the pith in the middle of the plank is not "flatsawn", it is pure quartersawn.

Semantics, maybe, but in this situation even though you could call a that plank quartersawn, it could come from a log that is flatsawn.

All I'm really trying to get at is that at least to some extent, "quartersawn" is a matter of degree, and that quartersawn grain doesn't necessarily have to come from a quartersawn log.

Let me add, phinds, that I've been to your site a number of times and think you are providing a great service to all of us. I, for one, appreciate it.
 
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