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Trying to build the traditional bed out of Wood Magazine May 2013 issue but this joint has me at a loss.

I'm trying to build this with minimal tools, I don't have a nice drill press or router table and I'm trying to find a table saw that will accept a 3/4" dado set for flexibility in the future.

My question is focused on the end of the board. I understand the sides are run through a table saw with a 1/4" blade but I have no idea how the ends are supposed to be cut. Please help! :)



Wood Room Design Pulpit Architecture
 

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Basically the same way. A 3/8" dado blade set at a 1/4 depth on a table saw or a router in a table to make all the cuts.
 

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I used the Bump Cut technique to cut a bunch of tenons for the railing on a bunk bed I just finished. It went fairly quick and it was easy.
 

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If you only have a single blade you could do the through dadoes first, and then using a sled, or a miter gauge, crosscut the tenon. If doing a bump cut with hardwood, small elevation changes should be utilized. If you don't have power/battery tool, or electricity, the tenon can be done with a mallet and a chisel.






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The easiest way to make that joint is with a tongue and groove router bit set. I bought a new set like that off ebay for about 60 bucks. You can also cut it with a dado set on a table saw but you need to be sure the thickness of the wood is consistant. Otherwise some tenons will rattle and some will be so tight they won't fit.
 

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Center groove down long board

It should be noted too that your success with using a table saw to run a center groove down a long board really depends on how straight and square that board is.

And, as everyone here knows, getting a long board straight and square is a challenge in and of itself. (At least it is for me. :))

Riding a router along the top, using one side of your piece as a guide for your fence will at least allow the router to follow along any long bow or cup in the wood and keep it more towards the center. Of course you lose the ease of set up with a table saw.
 
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