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So my wife wants a new dresser and after some discussion we have found a few designs she likes. You know the "I like the drawers from this one, the top from this one, and the legs from that one".... Now it is up to me to design and build it.
her eis my issue she found some legs that she really loves but I can not figure out how they are cut and made......of course I can't see the product in real life, all I have are pics. it is a two piece part from what I can tell but it looks like the angle it attaches it couldn't be a two part piece.
So of course I am turning to the WWT and see what you guys or gals would do.
here is the website the legs come from. I am interested in how the legs are made and attach to the carcass from the kyoto series.
http://www.erikorganic.com/bedroom/dresser-horizontal-kyoto.shtml
 

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It appears to me that it's a cabinet, with the leg pieces attached to the face frame and side?
 

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So my wife wants a new dresser and after some discussion we have found a few designs she likes. You know the "I like the drawers from this one, the top from this one, and the legs from that one".... Now it is up to me to design and build it.
her eis my issue she found some legs that she really loves but I can not figure out how they are cut and made......of course I can't see the product in real life, all I have are pics. it is a two piece part from what I can tell but it looks like the angle it attaches it couldn't be a two part piece.
So of course I am turning to the WWT and see what you guys or gals would do.
here is the website the legs come from. I am interested in how the legs are made and attach to the carcass from the kyoto series.
http://www.erikorganic.com/bedroom/dresser-horizontal-kyoto.shtml
This is a fairly challenging procedure, and best suited to a moderate to advanced woodworker. One of several of the challenges is that the legs at the top of the dresser are in a parallel plane to the front of the case, but at the bottom the leg is splayed out at 20 - 30 degrees from the front plane of the case. Where the leg attaches to the case at the inner edge of the leg is parallel to the front of the case.

The leg is laminated from 2 pieces because there has to be a twist involved. Steam bending, special jigs, set ups, orders of operations, are involved. Can be done with common tools (the exception being the steam box.)

This is a very doable project, but needs to be well thought out. It will require lots of typing depending on your skill level, reasoning skills... I had to think about it for a couple of minutes to figure it out. Maybe what I have written enough? Want to know how to steam bend and laminate to achieve the desired twist? How serious are you?
 

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Looks like it's something like this:
asdf.jpg
That's the view from the top. For attachment, it would be glue and probably screws from the inside. The photo you posted looked like the legs were at an odd angle, not 45, so I did that in my little drawing too.

Acer
 

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Looks like it's something like this:
View attachment 88991
That's the view from the top. For attachment, it would be glue and probably screws from the inside. The photo you posted looked like the legs were at an odd angle, not 45, so I did that in my little drawing too.

Acer
At the foot of the leg yes, but not where it meets the top. To the O.P. I'll check back later. A better typist than I, or another creative member may fill in the picture, or hint toward another method. Props to all.
 

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In the pictures posted in the OP those legs aren't bent, they're cut that shape. Follow the grain lines and you'll see they do not follow the arc of the leg. Also, where the legs meet the case it is completely parallel to the face frame, not bent.


It looks to me like Acercanto's diagram has it fairly accurate. The two pieces of the leg meet at the corner of the case. That is the corner sits at the seem between the two layers of the leg lamination.

I'd build the leg with a block at the top and bottom with a groove along the seem that the case sits in, fairly simple. Hell, you can probably do it just by offsetting the "back" lamination of the leg to not be as deep. Or you could do the full lamination, cut it out and then use a router or tablesaw to rabbet it like in the attached picture.

I do agree it will take some noodling and careful planning to execute it as nicely as the example, no matter what method you come up with for doing it.
 

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Yes I agree that the outside edge as well as the inside edge are also band sawn, or otherwise shaped. See that as another step. Your case leg is not quite drawn correctly as the leg has an even reveal where the leg sits proud of the face frame, but parallel at that point. Maybe you could draw the same view, but where the top of the leg meets the top? Even more awesome would be to draw the leg in 3d inside a rectangular prism. Include the arched cut on the outside edge as well as the detail cuts on the inside. I'd do it, but I am a newbie at sketch up. Perhaps a couple of additional pics from the op would help all of us. Thanks for your input Frank. It is a little complex

Bill
 

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Imagine the legs cut from a square block. While it is a block cut the angled notch in the inside corner to receive the square cabinet. Then cut the curves from the block. Attach with glue and possibly screws from inside the cabinet.

No twist. Nothing too complicated. A good example of how angling and a simple curve cut can add delightful dimension to an ordinary cabinet though.
 

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The face grain of the leg is also cut. Perhaps it was cut from two adjacent sides like when making a cabrio leg, then the outside arc cut in such a way that the lamination line stayed centered and was used as a reference line, or the manufacture wanted less cracking, additional strength, or perhaps as a cost cutting method. Looking at the grain orientation of the leg, steam bending the twist may be difficult as wood bends best along its length. (though I've certainly had my share of twisted lumber, lol) I'd definitely make a prototype first, before committing. Can someone draw this up?
 

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Imagine the legs cut from a square block. While it is a block cut the angled notch in the inside corner to receive the square cabinet. Then cut the curves from the block. Attach with glue and possibly screws from inside the cabinet.

No twist. Nothing too complicated. A good example of how angling and a simple curve cut can add delightful dimension to an ordinary cabinet though.
Look at the 2nd picture in post one. The leg shows clearly at least to me to be parallel to the face of the front of the dresser. What do you see in that picture? It looks to follow the front edge of the rectangular top.
 

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I think that the curves are throwing everyone off by making the legs look like they are set at an angle when they are not. Its the same kind of optical illusion as when you draw a square in perspective. The square may have the same lengths along each side, but the human eye makes it look more like a parallelogram.

IMO, the legs are simply two pieces, laminated (glued) together with a rabbit, in the back side of the leg and a curve cut along one edge and a matching curve at the tops and bottoms of the other. Then probably glued and/or screwed to the front and sides of the carcass.
 

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I think that the curves are throwing everyone off by making the legs look like they are set at an angle when they are not. Its the same kind of optical illusion as when you draw a square in perspective. The square may have the same lengths along each side, but the human eye makes it look more like a parallelogram.

IMO, the legs are simply two pieces, laminated (glued) together with a rabbit, in the back side of the leg and a curve cut along one edge and a matching curve at the tops and bottoms of the other. Then probably glued and/or screwed to the front and sides of the carcass.
Yes, I do believe you are right after looking at the pictures again. Definitely a +1 unless the op shows more pics . I think I was had.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks to everyone that posted. I tend to over think and over complicate things. Your comments and pics really helped me to figure out the piece. Johnie52 put into words exactly what I was having issues with. The angles were messing with my mind.after seeing the pics franks and acre anti posted I think I can figure it out.
Now onto the next issue. Figuring out the rest of the design and getting it into sketchup (which I am trying to learn)
 

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Old Skool, I originally showed the drawing with legs parallel to the front face of the corner but decided I think the legs look better angled. Either way works, and isn't significantly harder to build. I never thought the legs were curved in any way but I kind of like the offset look.

You're right, my drawing also shows the front edge tapered into the case when it should be proud the whole length. That was me just being lazy.
 
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