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Recently I purchased a seven-piece set of the WoodOwl OverDrive bits. I was helping my son with his house remodeling project using the 1.25" bit to cut some air holes in 2x6s. After cutting about 40 holes I hit a nail and rendered the bit worthless. I then switched to my 1" and finished by drilling another 40 holes. I don't think I hit any nails with the 2nd bit but it is now also super dull. I've contacted WoodOwl and they claim they can be sharpened but I will not get the factory edge. Three times I've asked how to sharpen them but so far they have not told me how to do this.

So, any thoughts as to how I can sharpen them? The bits are made from high-carbon steel, thus I was surprised that they were so easily dulled.
 

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You will probably get a variety of responses to this. If they are high carbon steel rather than high speed alloy steel, overheating will dull them as much as abrasion will; and a hand file will sharpen them as easily as a grinding wheel will. I haven't used them myself, but they look like shanked down twist drills with a brad point grind. It's easy to screw up brad points on a bench grinder. I suggest a round or half round second cut file and some steel blue layout die. Blue the ends; put the drill in a vice; and file, working from the back to the cutting edge using the blue die to show what you've done. The relief filing can be irregular so long as when you get to the cutting edge there's just two uniform, narrow lands left of the existing edges to take down evenly on both wings. This way you get the hang of the filing motion before you file the critical cutting edges. You can re-blue the filed back portion to gauge how much of the critical edge land you are filing down. It is hard to maintain two even cutting edges after a couple of sharpenings without more elaborate grinding jigs.
 
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