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Discussion Starter #1
what's the best way to clean your paint brushes when using oil based paints and
polyurethanes?

same question about cleaning sprayguns.
 

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LOL.... throw away brushes. My Dad would simply KILL me if I ever used (much less purchased) a throw away brush (not counting a foam brush of course). I've got nice brushes that cost more than I care to think about, that are older than my kids (both in their late teens). A good high quality brush will last for years if taken care of. And, that begins with using the correct type of brush with the medium you are using. For example.... a China bristle brush will absorb water over time which will eventually break it down and so should not be used with any acrylic or water based product. The same with cleaning brushes..... use whatever the solvent is in the medium you are working with. If it's lacquer, then use lacquer thinner. If it's oil based, then use mineral spirits (or plain old paint thinner). Alcohol based (shellac or some dye stains)..... you would use denatured alcohol and then finish with some soap and water. Take your time, get your brushes good and clean and then store them in the card board wrappers they came in and they will always keep a nice shape.

Take good care of your brushes and they will take care of you.
 

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I Agrey with JW if you use the same base as the product you are using it will not hurt the brushes I also have some old ones that I would hurt anyone trying to take them. I use a brush comb and a fine wier brush, rap them in brown paper and store them bristles down but not touching the bristles.
 

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I Agrey with JW if you use the same base as the product you are using it will not hurt the brushes I also have some old ones that I would hurt anyone trying to take them. I use a brush comb and a fine wier brush, rap them in brown paper and store them bristles down but not touching the bristles.
Yeah Steve.... I even still have some of my Dad's brushes. One of which was HIS Dad's. My grandfather was a professional painter and passed on his passion for taking care of your tools to my Dad.... who passed it on to me. I still have every single brush cover (you know, the cardboard bristle cover with the tie string thingie that you wrap around and around that little button) that originally came with my brushes. Every one of my brushes look like they could go back on the wall at Sherwin Williams or Porter.

I second the use of a brush comb every now and then.
 
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