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Discussion Starter #1
Bloodwood bowl in the making. I have 50 grit to 600 grit paper, #0000 steel wool, several grades of buffing wheels, rouge, oil etc. I just don't know the procedure.
 

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More info needed. What kind of oil do you plan to use? I would skip the buffing wheel, rouge and steel wool. I always like sanding and finishing bowls on the lathe. If you start with 50 grit paper you will have to do a whole lot of sanding to get rid of the scratches it makes. I would start with 80 if possible. When you get above 100 grit I like to dampen the wood with water between grit changes to raise the grain. It makes the sanding more effective and opens the grain pores. Sanding to 600 grit the wood should almost have a shine to it without putting any oil on it. Depending on the oil you use let it dry and sand it between coats with the 600 grit. It will mudd up on the sandpaper but is worth it. Just keep oiling and sanding until you get the finish like you want it.
 

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More info needed. What kind of oil do you plan to use? I would skip the buffing wheel, rouge and steel wool. I always like sanding and finishing bowls on the lathe. If you start with 50 grit paper you will have to do a whole lot of sanding to get rid of the scratches it makes. I would start with 80 if possible. When you get above 100 grit I like to dampen the wood with water between grit changes to raise the grain. It makes the sanding more effective and opens the grain pores. Sanding to 600 grit the wood should almost have a shine to it without putting any oil on it. Depending on the oil you use let it dry and sand it between coats with the 600 grit. It will mudd up on the sandpaper but is worth it. Just keep oiling and sanding until you get the finish like you want it.
That's one of my questions. What oil, if any, I should use. At a certain point I like too burnish with a handful of shavings from the lathe. The #0000 leaves a very smooth finish but can be a bear to clean up. Even tack cloth leaves some residue.
 

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If the bowl is used dry then you could use Watco Oil Finish or Bri-wax. If the bowl is ever going to be wet I would use a 100% Tung oil finish. Rockler sells one.

The clean up is what I have against steel wool also. It breaks down and the steel bits get into the fibers of the wood. I think you can achieve the same thing without the mess with the 600 grit sandpaper. You just have to watch out for third degree burns doing it. You might laminate some on a glit sanding pad with some spray adhesive. The foam pad would protect you.
 

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I just did a test on a piece of bloodwood. The surface was from my planer, at the time sharp knives, so it looked smooth. One are on the right was still rough sawn.

I used my Beall buffing wheel with the Tripoli compound. As expected it produced a polished surface. The rough sawn area had polished highlights, but still showed the saw marks, which I expected.

I then sanded the rough sawn area with 220 to remove most of the saw marks.

I then re-buffed and again a nice polished surface, except for the couple of deep saw marks I had not tried to sand out.

I did not take a picture since I am not expecting to be able to get the polish effect to show.

If you have buffing wheels and Tripoli compound (aka rouge) then it seems you do not need to sand much more than 220 grit and should be able to get the polished surface you desire.

On my turnings I normally sand to finer grit e.g., 400-600 before buffing with Tripoli compound.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Two different procedures

Guess I'll have to try them both. By the way what happened to this tung oil? Some time ago I used tung oil for a project, put the remaining oil in a Vacum Sealed Jar. It turned too cheese.
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In the past with bloodwood turnings (although I've never turned a bowl with it) I sand to 600 grit, then use Micro Mesh sandpaper at low speed, then use CrystalCoat. Although I will admit that I just tried CrystalCoat with a maple bowl and it doesn't seem to work quite as well on bowls as it does on small turnings.

Buffing bloodwood gave me trouble when I expiremented years ago - although I don't have the Beall system - and my Tripoli, White Diamond Rouge, and Pink Scratchless might be specifically formulated for metalwork, which was why I had them (I didn't try some of the others I have which I'm fairly certain are specifically suited for metal). The problem was that while the compounds actually did work in the sense that I got a nice luster, the compounds got stuck in the wood pores which had an interesting look to it, but not the look I wanted. Same problem with purpleheart.
 

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ThanksTC

All my polishing compounds are for metal also. I wondered if there might be a problem getting it off the wood after the polishing was done. I use 100# air, shop vac, and tack cloth for the swarf.
 

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Our Bloodwood gets used in traditional bow riser parts.As such,they're sanded to very specific grits and then CC'd with a proprietary Epoxy finish......bla,bla,bla.

Just as a suggestion....you might look into polishing compounds used for automotive paints.Just sayin,they have to be easily cleaned off and not contaminating to any subsequent finishes......IE,they're "clean".We use them for polishing finishes,which include wood subjects outside of "car world".We're a 'Presta" shop.

http://www.prestaproducts.com/presta-news.aspx?ArticleID=4
 

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All my polishing compounds are for metal also. I wondered if there might be a problem getting it off the wood after the polishing was done. I use 100# air, shop vac, and tack cloth for the swarf.
The Tripoli compound in the Beall buffing system does not contaminate the surface. You can apply whatever finish you want afterwards.

I buff all my turnings with the Tripoli compound before I apply any finish. This will show any scratches from sanding or tools marks I missed. Easier to clean up the surface before finding this out with the first coat of finish.
 
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