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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks,

First post, and I figured it would be prudent just to get to the point.

I've designed a new type of ergonomic easel, for painting, that can let the user, with one motion, unlock the canvas, move the canvas to any section they want to get to, without getting up or twisting their body, and lock it into place with a simple push of the mechanism into the frame of the easel.

I've designed it to be made entirely out of wood, with no use of nails or glues--just dowels, stoppers, and the forces of it holding itself together. It looks like it will work in my head, but I've no idea on how to start making one out here.

I've bought myself a router, jigsaw/scrollsaw, powered drill, and already had my mitre-table saw. I started to play on some scrap wood last night with the jigsaw.

I guess I wanted to ask how do I get started? I've got measurements for each piece done. I've got drawings of every piece I need to make done. I just need to get the pieces done. All the cuts are straight, or at the most 45° angles, with a few routed guides alone the frame and axis pieces. The hardest part is going to be making the wheels, but the manual for the saw showed me what I would need to get those done with a guide, so it shouldn't be too bad. The smallest cuts are going to be 1/4 " teeth.

I was going to make it out of douglas fir, but it's just way too heavy. I bought a few pieces of cedar instead as it was much, much lighter, which is going to be important.

Can you give me any advice on getting started? After I've done that, I've also designed a table that can be raised or lowered with a simple pinching mechanism under the table top, that goes with the easel. It can also be rotated to expand, but I think that's been patented, so I may have to rework that design.
 

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You say that you have designed this easel. However, it is all in your head.

The first thing that you need to do is sketch the design to paper.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've done that.

For all the pieces I need.

I'm asking what I need to do once that's done. Do I make patterns to work from, or do I just keep going until I get lucky and the piece isn't incorrect?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay so then I need your help with this. Knowing absolutely nothing about woodworking, what can I build so that a cut only goes a certain length without going in further? What do I use to make sure that the cuts are all evenly spaced, and is it possible to do right angle cuts with a jigsaw, given that they need to be 1/4" squares, or is it just easier to use a router?
 

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!/4 inch squares? For the teeth you mentioned, I suppose. You say you have a table miter saw. That part is confusing me. Is it a table saw, or a miter (chop) saw? If it's a chop saw I wouldn't try making such small parts on it. With a table saw using a sled, or the miter gage with a zero clearance insert you could safely cut the parts. Or a jig saw with a fine tooth blade will cut smooth parts. Then assemble.
 

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Why don't you post a picture or two of the small parts with the 1/4" square cuts you are talking about. If we could see exactly what it is you are trying to cut and what tools you have available, we can offer better advice.
 

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where's my table saw?
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It's called a mock up or prototype

I've done that.

For all the pieces I need.

I'm asking what I need to do once that's done. Do I make patterns to work from, or do I just keep going until I get lucky and the piece isn't incorrect?
You will have to make a working model/mockup of your idea. I've made quite a few before getting it right. :laughing: The woodworking processes involved depends on the joinery , and strength needed of the pieces. A frame made entirely of wood that has the requisite strength is an advanced project since the wood has grain direction and is limited in strength. Twisting, bending and shearing forces on the joints will determine what type of joint will work best.

Without a drawing for us to see, it will be difficult to recommend or give specific advice. But I also understand it may not be in your best interest to disclose your plans here.

The best way to build a prototype is to engage the services of a confidant who you can work with directly, and who is experienced in the woodworking trade. :yes: You mention cutting teeth above, but again because of the wood grain and direction, teeth may break off along the grain .... You also mentioned cedar and pine, both soft wood where grain may be an issue. Laminating thin pieces together greatly increases the strength of wood and reduces the tendency for it to split along the grain, since there is no longer one grain direction. There are many things to consider here as well as the weight.

One of my first woodworking projects was an easel .... many years ago. I made it from redwood which was plentiful at the time, light weight and fairly strong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry. It's a table saw that can be angled to do mitre cuts. I'm about to start looking into finding a woodsy confidant.
 
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