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I am an image archivist for the Workers' History Museum in Ottawa, Canada. Attached is a drawing by a well-known illustrator of the mid-1800s of a sawmill at the Rideau Falls in Ottawa, where the Ridea and Ottawa rivers meet. It was the site of a succession of lumber mills for 100 years, and this one must surely have been one of the first.



Can anyone explain what I am seeing here? I presume hydraulic-driven saws were in the building at the top, but did the logs come from the river below up the clearly-visible ramp, lubricated by a flow of water? Or from upstream, and the angled ramp is for something else? The Ottawa River (below) was a major thoroughfare for log rafts (and in fact that is what the thing with the sail on it is). The earliest ones went to Montreal, far downriver, but eventually the local mills could handle all the timber coming from the region.
 

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I think the actual mill is not shown in the picture. It looks to me like the building is at the end of the flume where logs are dropped in the river. I believe if it was a mill there would be a water wheel shown on the river side.
 

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I am an image archivist for the Workers' History Museum in Ottawa, Canada. Attached is a drawing by a well-known illustrator of the mid-1800s of a sawmill at the Rideau Falls in Ottawa, where the Ridea and Ottawa rivers meet. It was the site of a succession of lumber mills for 100 years, and this one must surely have been one of the first.



Can anyone explain what I am seeing here? I presume hydraulic-driven saws were in the building at the top, but did the logs come from the river below up the clearly-visible ramp, lubricated by a flow of water? Or from upstream, and the angled ramp is for something else? The Ottawa River (below) was a major thoroughfare for log rafts (and in fact that is what the thing with the sail on it is). The earliest ones went to Montreal, far downriver, but eventually the local mills could handle all the timber coming from the region.
To start with we have to remember it's a rendention/opinion/someone's view....BUT it could be factual just not drawn as we'd think it should be. I believe the mill was/is at the top as shown with a log incline to pull logs up (as log in pic shows) and in the background you see the water sluice to feed the saw power. Jay may be able to help as he's studied some of the vintage ways in wood.
 
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