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Hello, so I am a complete noob to woodworking other than just hammering pieces together so I am not sure how to proceed with this. Basically, I make big jenga blocks using 2x3 pieces of regular stud pine wood and sand it with 80grit paper. The problem is that even though I try to smooth it out, the weight of the tower makes it hard to move the blocks around when they are stacked.

I know I can probably use candle wax and just keep sanding it more, but was wondering if there was a faster way to do this? Someone mentioned a machine (I forget what its called) that instead of sanding it cuts a very thin layer of the wood off, making it very smooth and even.

I just want to make it slippery, but in a way that will not take too long. Any ideas? Thanks.
 

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I am not familiar with the jenga game, so I am not able to picture the blocks.

A table saw with a decent blade can cut wood to a very smooth feel.

If you are not able to cut to the desired smoothness, then you may end up needing to apply some product to fill in the roughness of the wood.

Take a look at SlipIt. One of several options.
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2004247/9013/slipit-jell-1-pint.aspx
 

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You need to be sanding way past 80 grit to get these blocks smooth and to make them work properly as a Jenga game they need to match perfectly in size.

The machine your talking about is a planer but you cant plane blocks the size you mention without a sled. They would still require sanding afterward anyhow.

For those wondering what a Jenga game is, it is a game of wood blocks stacked in a staggering pattern. The idea is to remove blocks from the tower without toppeling the tower.
 

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Part of the problem is the weight of the blocks. It's a matter if physics, the heavier the blocks, the mire force it's going to take to move them. That aside, try sanding through 220 or even 320 and then apply several coats of wax.
 
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