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Howdy,
Long time reader first time poster.
I'm new to woodworking and are making my second coffee table. It's going to be 3 large recycled stringy-bark wharf beams. I have dressed them and sanded them back, I'm happy with how they are looking but are concerned about people getting splinters if the run their hands across the surface.
The plan was to finish it with Tang oil and some Gilly Stephenson's timber polish (bees wax). Is there anything I can do to stop splinters happening, the sanding has stopped most of them but I think there could still be a few.
 

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On the spot you are showing I would be inclined to mix some bondo the almost black brown it is and fill it. There also clear epoxy fillers you could use. Just mask off the surrounding wood, fill it and sand it smooth. The tung oil should be enough to bring the sheen back.
 

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I've used clear epoxy and then some colorant to mimic the grain pattern. Mix some colorants with some epoxy on the side to use as accents , blend some additional epoxy tinted to be the base color, pour this mix into the cervix,. Then using the other color mix to accent grain pattern. Tom
 

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Hi WoodWorkinghelp101,

It looks like it is already in the correct orientation, yet I would share (like floors) a piece of wood that will receive human contact of rubbing (traditionally) is only oriented Bark Side Up. This mitigates the severity and/or length of splinters, and is the way wood was usually oreiented in the past typically.

I don't employ modern materials nor care for the plastic look that is gotten from epoxies (for the most part.) The methods thus discribe by other posters do work and very well in my view. For a more traditional fix I would just use a hide glue and fill all voids with a mix of this and saw dust colored to the tone you wish.

I would share a good mix of traditional Pine Rosine, Beeswax, Flax, and Tung Oil should lock down the splitters more than well enough. 3 coats would do just as good as most epoxy applications for this and is a simple finish to redo and/or reverse. Stripping epoxies and other plastic finishes is a nightmare...assuming it can be done at all...

Regards,

j
 
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