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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've been making some honey dippers. So far, I've been using the cheapest of the cheap which is $2 furring strips from Home Depot. They measure 1.5" square and I've been making 6.5" dippers. When they're done, I dip them in mineral oil and let them soak. I've made four of these.

I don't know the exact name of the wood used to make these boards. Still, I'm not completely sure they would be 100% safe for food uses. I could still sell the honey dippers as decorative items, although I don't think I could say they're safe for food unless I was relatively sure. Does anyone know about these types of wood and their properties for culinary uses?

Ed
 

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Mankind has been using wooden utensils forever so I wouldn't worry about it. You can look up woods that are sensitizers or poisens on the web. I would avoid those simply because they might make some people sick. Of our domestic woods Walnut is one of the few. My dad is alergic to walnut dust but it doens't bother him to eat out of a walnut bowl.
 

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Most likely pine or Douglas Fir. Either should be food safe even though the wood is soft and harder to get crisp details than hardwood.

If I were doing it I think I would buy ash or hickory replacement handles for rakes, etc. Probably get 8 out of a 5.5 ft handle or about $1 each. They may also have oak or other wood in the dowell store section.
 

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Electronics Designer
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It seems I forgot about this thread. I do indeed have a picture for you and here it is.

988366_200394163477261_263737999_n.jpg
 

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I've been reading lately about the kiln drying process and have read that chemicals are sometimes used to prevent shrinkage and cracking when kiln drying wood.

Maybe lumber should include an MSDS :)
 
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