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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the tools I inherited recently is a bit of a mystery to me. It has a sanding bar across the bottom but no overhead assembly. I think it looks like a kind of drum sander but I don’t know how even pressure could be applied across a piece in progress. It is definitely home made. The frame is hollow. The is a simple motor underneath that drives the spindle with a green chain belt. Any ideas what this is and what it is for?
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does it have a motor ?
about how many RPMs does it turn ?
it is strange, I'll give you that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, it has a motor. No clue on the rpms but it doesn’t look variable. I can’t think of a practical application for this. Maybe it was going to be a homemade drum sander but wasn’t finished. I would expect to see more work done to the work surface if that was the case though.
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where's my table saw?
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YUP, a surface sander! The depth of "cut" is controlled by the amount of tilt to the table which pivots on one side. The more of the drum that's exposed the greater the depth of "cut". What you see is all there is to it. Guitar makers use them a lot for thin stock because it won't get torn up inside a spinning cutter or drum and you can control the rate of feed unlike a belt powered feeder which may have a variable speed, but doesn't have the same "feel" to it when feeding the stock. It looks very well made and you should keep it by all means!
 

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Stockroom Supply has offered kits to build these for years, this is a complete unit they sell as well:
 

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What @Alex Grubbs has looks like it could be from a Stockroom/Flatmaster kit. Cool idea, but not cheap for the amount of DIY involved, I guess the way to make it a good deal is if you don't have to buy a new motor. The "complete" version doesn't include a motor either.
 

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From @FrankC 's Stockroom link:
7. Centrifugal force is a key element. Firstly it lifts paper off the drum creating an air gap. The air gap prevents the drum from creating heat, which in turn helps paper to last longer. Secondly, centrifugal force means it takes less power to run the "V"-Drum as the drum is not forcing the paper into the wood.

And:
3. Klingspor brand stearate coated paper will sand pine, paint and even nails without damaging the sandpaper, a savings to the user.

This seems to be the recommended sand paper: 4-1/2" wide Sandpaper Roll Hook & Loop Stearate Coated
 

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It seems kind of like a drum I used on the lathe for awhile to sand inside rounded parts for chair backs.. I just held the parts from the top and the sawdust would drop right to the floor. I never thought to use it with a flat surface on top, but it makes sense as does using velcro. I used sticky back paper on just a big, round cylinder and it worked fine for a lot of odd shapes.. I imagine I could do basically the same thing with the lathe, just a longer cylinder and a flat slotted surface mounted over it.. I might set it up for things if I find the space for it..
 
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