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I acquired a bit of Holly. The main piece was the base of the trunk, it measured 27" narrowing to about 18" and it was about 5' long, cut into two pieces down the center. It was cut down in Portland OR. about one and one-half weeks ago. It should have been cut in February. At this point I have had it slabbed at a local sawyer. It yielded about 125 Bd Ft., I had the main two pieces sliced at 10/4 and the others at 8/4.
The problem is that since it was cut too early it is VERY wet. As soon as the light hits it it begins staining a blue/green; I mean as soon as the light hits it, it starts turning. As the sawyer was slicing it the sawdust would be white and then turn green by the time he finished the cut. Does anyone have any experience with Holly? When I get this dried will I be able to plane the lumber and get it back to white? I plan on stickering it, strapping it tightly, and letting it air dry for about 8 months. To kiln dry it I am told that the cost would be a minimum of $500. Anyone have any thoughts?? ken
 

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Wood Snob
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I've only seen holly white when it was finished so I would assume it will again be white. I don't know the reason but they use it with teak for flooring in boats.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Circle or band mill? The only thing I would think is a reaction to metal. Bluing( not to be confused with what happens to pine) is what I call it, usually if the feed rate is too slow/ or lots of tension in tree squeezed blade. I see it all the time. Usually not a whole logs, just a board here and there. Picture would help. If it's that, you will want to get it off ASAP. It bleeds right in. Run them through a planer.
 
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