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Cliffs: I want to build a climate controlled mini shop "shed" and put bigger tools on rolling stands. Is this a dumb idea, and if so, why?

I'm a research and plan type of guy, so I've got several plans sketched out on paper for various projects. (platform bed, end table, end-grain cutting boards, stairwell pantry, etc).

The problem is that a) I have next-to-zero experience, b) I have next-to-zero equipment, c) I have limited space/storage, and d) I really can only spare 1-2 weekends a month. In a few months, I'm moving into a house with an unfinished/unpartitioned basement and a detached unheated 1.5 car garage. It's in St. Louis, where the summer can be >100F with 100% humidity and the winter can be <0F.

If I turn a corner of the basement into a shop, I'll be able to work any time of year, and I won't really have to worry about rust too much. But my concern is that I'll have to figure out dust collection in a serious way because I don't see dust playing nice with the gas furnace or laundry area. I'd rather not be looking at an extra $500-1000+ to rig up a decent dust collection system. Also, my wife doesn't really like the idea of a woodshop in the basement producing significant noise, let alone dust.

If I use the garage, my shop time is a little more limited unless I heat/cool an uninsulated garage a few months out of the year. But, I could get away with less stringent dust collection (or maybe work in the driveway and skip it entirely). The issue is that I don't want to spend money on gear that will rust out in a single a St. Louis summer. So I got to thinking that I could build a well-insulated mini-shed inside the garage and set up a portable ~5000btu air conditioner. If I were to buy a new AC unit + materials, my estimate for this is ~$500. It'd also be another project for me to be able to practice honing skills on.

Thoughts?
 

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I live close to St. Louis and my shop is a large pole barn. A dehumidifier in the summer helps but rust still happens without protection. I'm lucky that the concrete slab is set up for radiant heat by the previous owner but I don't have a boiler or other set up yet. Plans for that down the road but for now I just bundle up in the winter. Once i get rolling I'm fine.
I have a buddy with a basement shop. He walled off a section for his shop. This separates the shop from the furnace and he has a pretty serious dust collection set up. The other benefit of walling it off is that it keeps his workshop from accumulating misc junk storage like the rest of the basement and keeps the kids out. If the house has cold air return ductwork for the furnace the basement dust should be less of an issue anyway than if the furnace just pulls in air from the basement.
 

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my concern is that I'll have to figure out dust collection in a serious way because I don't see dust playing nice with the gas furnace or laundry area.
For what it's worth, that's what my plumber said as well. Every time the boiler fired it just sucked up sawdust. I wasn't too good about sweeping up. Got a Rockler wall-mounter unit for just over $200 a few years ago - @$250 now. More responsible about cleaning up these days.
 

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As you get more into woodworking, you'll be getting sick of breathing dust and cleaning constantly. So you'll be looking into DC systems anyhow. Even in the garage you'll have to have a vacume system of some sort. Maybe it's just a $100 shop vac.

I started working in my basement and now I'm set up in the garage. Trust me when I say having constant temps in the basement is very nice.
 

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Cliffs: I started typing something relevant but then I started to summarize all the things I was googling. Long story short, am I crazy for wanting to do the climate controlled shed if this is the kind of thought process I have for basement considerations?

I'd prefer the basement if there were a reasonable endpoint to costs. Everything else that follows is what I am thinking, and the fact that I'm thinking about these things is why I'm considering a climate controlled mini-shed. I'm still not sure if this is a crazy idea or if there's some logic to it.

If I went the basement route, there are some issues. It's a very old house- I've got about 8'6" from slab to joist, but there's plumbing, gas, and HVAC that runs below the joists at various sections (7' clearance in some places) and some edges have open gaps between the subfloor planks to the living space above. So if I were to create a basement shop, I'd have to put up at least two walls and a funky ceiling. I am pretty sure that the cost to wall off and seal off a workshop with good dust collection would obliterate what budget I have for the fun tools. I'd also need a DC that fits within a 6'6"-8'0" max and that runs on 110V. Power is also a concern as the panel and service are rated for 100A (although we're planning to have both changed out in the near-ish future for other reasons).

Also, we're thinking about kids in the next few years, so my priorities are air quality>noise>cost. So HEPA or high MERV is a must from the start, but I don't see the point in spending a lot on a filter if I'm going to let it get clogged quickly without a cyclonic separation bin. Anyway, I'm definitely on board with an air cleaner. I would probably DIY that with a box fan/media filters. I'm considering electrical and height/size in the sense that they are potential nonstarters.

Here are the options I see:
~$650 for a HF DC ($200, 15-20A draw, 6'4"), Wynn 35A274NANO ($200, MERV 15), cyclone and trashcan ($150-250)
Pros: cheapest option, could upgrade over time
Cons: frankenstein factor, non-HEPA but close, questionable for duct/blastgate duty

$900 for a Grizzly G703/P ($900, 15-20A draw, 20-30A circuit, 5'6")
Pros: all-in-one, easily fits
Cons: Pushing limits of my budget, questionable for duct/blastgate duty. Not HEPA certified but specs match or exceed HEPA. Grizzly gets a lot of good press, so my gut is to trust their specs. On the other hand, they went through the Euro body for some reason, and they don't seem to offer verification by an independent lab.

$1135 for an Oneida Mini Gorilla-HEPA with stand/bin ($1135, 16-20A draw, maybe 20-30A circuit, 5'2")
Pros: all-in-one, HEPA, definitely fits
Cons: Exceeds my budget, questionable for stationary duct/blastgate duty

$1225 for Delta 50-760 ($550, 15-20A draw, 20-30A circuit, 6'11"), Oneida Super Dust Deputy ($250), Oneida HEPA Conversion ($300), Collection bin ($125)
Pros: well reviewed, definitely HEPA if I convert, could upgrade over time
Cons: Far exceeds my budget, frankenstein factor, pushes ceiling height limits unless I get the HEPA conversion, questionable for duct/blastgate duty

$1650 for an Oneida V-System 1500-HEPA ($1650, 16-20A draw, might need 30A circuit, 110/220V, 7'0")
Pros: all in one, highly rated, HEPA, can power a duct system
Cons: Far exceeds my budget, might not fit at all, sounds like it might require a new electrical drop

$2000 for Oneida 2HP Dust Gorilla Portable ($2000, 7-11A draw, 220V, 6'7")
Pros: all-in-one, highly rated, HEPA, can power a duct system, slightly more compact than V-System 1500
Cons: Far exceeds my budget, I don't have 220V service but this is for reference in case I somehow finagle 220V into my basement...
 
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