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A half hour south of us , there is a very small, rather old town. It has only a half dozen or so roads. One of those roads is called Old Schoolhouse Rd. and on that road is the original building… the Old School House. Although not a large structure, all it’s architectural details (both inside and out) are bold and from that period. (1860 to 1880). The first floor’s ceiling height is twelve feet with it’s windows beginning three feet off the floor and continuing to within a foot of the ceiling. I’m assuming that eight foot tall windows allowed a good deal of sunlight to illuminate the single, interior classroom. This historic structure is where our client’s family lives.
About 10 years ago, they expanded a small room in the back to accommodate what was to become their ‘new’ kitchen. They have good taste and wished to maintain the old building’s integrity. I spent some time designing cabinetry that could be described as somewhere between Shaker and a 'farm house look'. No fine detail. Bold, heavy frame and panel faces. Very utilitarian / a no-nonsense, sturdy, functional kitchen. I happen to love this look. Great to have people who like what you like to build.
As an aside, I have a few books about Shaker furniture. I find it ironic that in their adherence to modesty, to remain austere, their religious aversion to decoration, … they ended up creating buildings and furniture that, to this day are revered for their timeless beauty. Anyway,
The carpenters who enlarged the room, installed pine floors as might have been done back then (allows the wear and tear to show-up quickly, as well) and beadboard wainscot on the lower third of the walls. Then, my sons and I went about building and installing the cabs.

This above photo displays the strong, simple detailing we incoporated. We adjusted the proportions by increasing the width of the frames for the doors, drawer faces and side walls. This leaves a somewhat smaller panel in each of their centers.
I always like to finish the cabinet’s bottom edge with a piece of molding. Here we simply placed a square piece of 3/4″ stock ‘wrapping-around’ the cabs. Also notice there is no molding profile on the inside edges of any of the frames. The fact that every face (surface) on the cabinets are frame and panel is enough decoration by itself.
To give it a bit more detail (but not too much), we chamfered (45 degree beveled) wherever a cabinet’s outside vertical edge was exposed. Notice this bevel doesn’t run the entire height, but rounds out 3″ from top and bottom.
All this to achieve detail w/o it appearing too dainty or overly fanciful. Even the ‘fireslate’ counter tops (matt finished and natural in appearance) are left square on their outside edge but eased slightly (not sharp) to remain soft to the touch. These are the counter tops we all had in our high school science labs.
The wall cabinets possess the same detail with the addition of hand-made support brackets (corbels) and the cabinet’s top edges are finished with two, staggered square trim pieces (to act as a crown).


On an opposite wall we included a small unit for cookbooks.

The island’s counter top we made from 2″ X 8″ rock-maple planks / looks so much better than commercial butcher block. A refuse bag sits beneath this opening cut in the surface. Over-sized legs (6″ X 6″) support the counter’s cantilevered (over-hung) edge for seating.


The Old School House has just received Historic Landmark Status. I’m pleased we were asked to maintain it’s authentic character… and I love the way it turned out.


our website has a huge gallery and videos / visit, if you'd like...

Russell Hudson / Hudson Cabinetmaking, Inc.
 

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Whats so dang cool about that kitchen is,it will only look better with time!I'm very partial to Colonial Revival period of the 1930's when it comes to kitchens.BW
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Whats so dang cool about that kitchen is,it will only look better with time!I'm very partial to Colonial Revival period of the 1930's when it comes to kitchens.BW
that's the truth / especially the maple counter top.

Thanks, all you guys for the feedback...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
looks great .:thumbsup:


can I ask you about the finish, is that hand painted/sprayed,


I do like that colour.....
hand painted / if done well, it always looks better because I like all the telltale signs of something having been made with your hands / with care.
 
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nice..I also hand paint cabinets but normaly face frames only.

the larger pieces in your pics that are painted like the door panels and wide corners on the island look good.

:thumbsup:
 

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WOW!
Your excellent design and superb execution resulted in a fabulous period kitchen. What an inviting space. You and your customers have definitely proven the old saying that the kitchen is the heart of the home.
Well Done!:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Those are some beautiful cabinets for sure, you did a fantastic job on them.

I don't know about up North but down South many of the larger old 1800 and pryor homes didn't have a kitchen in the main house as they had kitchen fires way more than we do today. They built their kitchens away from the main house so it wouldn't burn the main house down.
 

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jiju1943 said:
Those are some beautiful cabinets for sure, you did a fantastic job on them.

I don't know about up North but down South many of the larger old 1800 and pryor homes didn't have a kitchen in the main house as they had kitchen fires way more than we do today. They built their kitchens away from the main house so it wouldn't burn the main house down.
Very affluent homes would have a separate kitchen, quite often in the servants quarters. Other than that, the kitchen was a great source of heat.
 
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