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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I am at the final stage of putting an old oak knockdown wardrobe togther after spending all summer refinishing. I amputting the doors on, and on the top, left hand corner, where the top hinge goes, the wood was cracked, due to stress, and i glued it with elmers wood glue. I thought it was repaired, until i tried to hang the door...now crack is a loose or a littlemorepronounced, and i do not believe the door, hinge will hold long term. I would like to know what you suggest. I am going to try to post a picture. Is there some super wood glue i can use to secure.. can i move the hinge lower or higher?

Thanks...
 

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I'm guessing you didn't clamp the crack repair when you glued it. Glues like Elmer's need clamping to be effective. You can warm the area up with a hair drier, may take awhile, pry the crack open very carefully with a small screwdriver in the screw hole. Warm up some Elmer's, just warm not hot. Work it into the crack by squeezing the crack open and closed, and use a putty knife to press the glue in. Get the glue as deep as possible. Wipe off the excess glue mess with a slightly damp rag or paper towel. You need a small C clamp and a couple scrap pieces of wood. Place some wax paper over the workpiece so the clamp blocks won't be glued to the work. Clamp it up, blocks on each side under the clamp so you can apply pressure without marking the work, remove the clamps and wipe off the rest of the squeeze out, then clamp it up again for 15-20 minutes and unclamp to check for more glue squeeze out. It's a lot easier to clean up wet or soft glue than it is with dried glue. Then clamp up overnight.

When you go to hang the door again, predrill the repair area to get rid of dried glue in the hole. I would use some epoxy on the screw threads when putting it back in. The repair should be stronger than the wood. You don't want to go with a different glue than Elmer's since you can't remove what is in there from the first attempt and that will prevent other glues from working. If you are not confident the repair will hold, get some longer hinges that will step over the repair and not use the same holes. You'll have to cut in longer gains with a chisel for different hinges.
 

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I do not think the glue penetrated.

I prefer the Titebond glues, but if the Elmers was a "yellow" glue it should also work.

You will need to carefully pry the break apart to get the glue deep into the crack as possible. Then clamp the piece to apply pressure while the glue cures.

If this does not work, a repair is possible, but not something easily advised by a forum posting. Lots of steps.
 

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Maker of sawdust
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no load

Should the steps that you followed in getting the wood repair works. you still have issues with hanging the door. hinges displace the load so I would lay your project on it's back mount the hinges top and bottom no door at this point. Once hinges are on get a helper to position the door screw in the good location first the do the area that will that is affected last then tilt the piece upright then try the door now the load is displaced evenly.

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you. I did clamp the piece when I originally glued it, and I suspect that the glue did not penetrate. I thought everything would be easy once the refinishing was complete. There is always a little something right at the end.
 

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it could be that some of the finish got in the crack

If any of the old finish or finish removed got into the crack, it would prevent the glue from bonding. If that's possible, I would switch to an fast setting epoxy rather than the glue.

PCV glues will soften when heated and regenerate/reattach, so that's good advice.

Another option is to add an additional hinge to help support the door(s). It means inletting the area for the hinge plate, but that's not too bad with a sharp knife to score the hinge plate and a sharp chisel to remove the waste material. my .02$

Another option is to simply relocate the hinge....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all. I am thinking that the best fix might be to simply move the hinge either up about an inch or down an inch. I am not certain how well I will be able to get the glue deep into the craxk without splitting and breaking the wood. I might need to find something like a small syringe to insert the glue if I decide to go that route. I found Loctite quikset epoxy with a syringe...does anyone have experience with this brand? Or suggest another epoxy. I am not certain if the Elmer's will ultimately hold.

Thank you.

Joe
 

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Thank you all. I am thinking that the best fix might be to simply move the hinge either up about an inch or down an inch. I am not certain how well I will be able to get the glue deep into the craxk without splitting and breaking the wood. I might need to find something like a small syringe to insert the glue if I decide to go that route. I found Loctite quikset epoxy with a syringe...does anyone have experience with this brand? Or suggest another epoxy. I am not certain if the Elmer's will ultimately hold.

Thank you.

Joe
You can get the glue very deep without forcing the crack open. Just apply the glue to the crack and push it in, like you would do in packing a bearing. Keep applying the glue and pushing it in until it fills. Then clamp up and wipe off the excess.






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