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I was reading on a forum how to mix hide glue ...1 level teaspoon to 2 oz. of water. That seems pretty thin. I've been looking around and everyone has an opinion as to mixing. I've got a bag of 192. I am determined to learn this veneering stuff and get it right. what do you all think.... does the above sound off?
 

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I have no experience with hide glue. But I do have a fairly good engineering understanding related to mixing glues, finishes, etcetera.

The important thing to remember is that the water goes away when the glue cures. It is primarily an agent to get the glue where you want it. More water means a thinner layer of glue holding everything together. It will also tend to flow better, creating a more uniform distribution of the glue on the surface. These two factors would lead to a more uniform surface in a veneering application.

The down side of thinner, is that the thinner you go, the less glue you end up with holding everything together. This means the bond will be weaker. Also, water tends to curl veneer. So, if you have too much water, you will get a weak bond and it will be harder to get a uniform surface.

With less water, you will get more glue on the project, but it will not flow as well, making it less uniform. If you are gluing to items that are thicker together, they will redistribute the glue more evenly when you clamp them together so this is not an issue. The additional glue will create a stronger bond. But, if you have too little water, then the glue could actually hold the pieces apart and generally, glues are much stronger as a thin film.

So, some of the variation you are seeing is due to how the glue is being used. Not only where it is used on a project ( more structure or smoother finish), but how it is applied. The person brushing it on is probably going to want a thinner mixture than the person using a putty knife. In addition, if I remember correctly, hide glue has to be heated. Since the final water content is the important factor. Heating time and temperature both factor into the final water content. Somebody who heats it longer will need to add more water than somebody who doesn't heat it as long.

All of that being said, my recommendation is to experiment. Since you are interested in veneering, focus on the information you can find about using hide glue with veneers (keeping in mind that not all veneers are the same thickness). Then try some different recipes to see what works for you. Keep in mind to consider the time factor, since testing on scraps will be much quicker than doing a full size piece unless you add in some wait time. Also remember to test the adhesion of the veneer and not just how it looks.
 
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