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Up until recently I have not had any real space to hone my craft. In July, I started building a shed. But more than just a shed. It is my happy place. It’s foundation is concrete and it’s bones are pallets. Interior is cedar and exterior is smart board with cedar accents. The best part is I have gotten a General table saw model 150. For a song. But I am unsure of how to connect the side rails and clamp. Not even sure if that is what they are called. If anyone has information one the General 150. I would love to hear it. Thanks
 

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where's my table saw?
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all your joints must be tight, or they will certainly fail.
 

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l do LOVE working with wood. does anyone know anything about the general table saw 150?


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johnep
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Check if saw still available and look for reviews.
Welcome to the forum. Perhaps you may have some pics of your projects.
We love to see them. Where are you? USA still asleep.
regards, johnep
 

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where's my table saw?
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28,158 Posts
Up until recently I have not had any real space to hone my craft. In July, I started building a shed. But more than just a shed. It is my happy place. It’s foundation is concrete and it’s bones are pallets. Interior is cedar and exterior is smart board with cedar accents. The best part is I have gotten a General table saw model 150. For a song. But I am unsure of how to connect the side rails and clamp. Not even sure if that is what they are called. If anyone has information one the General 150. I would love to hear it. Thanks
The General brand is well respected. I don't know about that model 150 table saw, however. What is important is the motor and the fence. A 1 HP motor will sufice for most home shop operations with the possible excepting of ripping down 2 1/2" thick hardwood lumber. Speaking of ripping, the fence is crucial to getting an accurate cut.
Look up You Tube for "setting up a table saw" and you'll learn more than we can discuss in a paragraph or two here.
Here's an example of that saw:
422657

Apparently they are rare, but very well built.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
The General brand is well respected. I don't know about that model 150 table saw, however. What is important is the motor and the fence. A 1 HP motor will sufice for most home shop operations with the possible excepting of ripping down 2 1/2" thick hardwood lumber. Speaking of ripping, the fence is crucial to getting an accurate cut.
Look up You Tube for "setting up a table saw" and you'll learn more than we can discuss in a paragraph or two here.
Here's an example of that saw:
View attachment 422657
Apparently they are rare, but very well built.
Up until recently I have not have any real space to hone my craft. In Julyinstartes building a shed. But more than just a shed. It is my happy place. It’s foundation is concrete and it’s bones are pallets. Interior is cedar and exterior is smart board with cedar accents. The best part is I have gotten a General table saw model 150. For a song. But I am unsure of how to connect the side rails and clamp. Not even sure if that is what they are called. If anyone has information one the General 150. I would love to hear it. Thanks
I have gotten the saw set up and running. But it sound like a bearing might be bad and the blade binds when cutting. I’m thinking maybe this wasn’t such a good deal. Does anyone work on these motors


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where's my table saw?
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Dealing with a questionable motor, is not the pervue of the inexperienced. There's a few reasons the blade may be binding that we can deal with here.
The blade and fence must be parallel to one another. The blade should be free from gum and pitch. The wood may be pinching the blade from internal stress made as the kerf relieves them. A splitter or riving knive will help with that. Warped and twisted wood will bind the blade every time. A jointer is used to flatten one side and make a straight edge to ride along the fence. Both are required to saw safely and accurately.
Whether a motor is developing full power to keep cutting when the blade tends to stall is more a matter of experience than having a "power measurement" device. However, there is a device called "Kill a Watt" from Amazon or Home Centers that will measure the amps and wattage used by various motors and appliances. If there is a heavy load on the motor, the current drawn will exceed the rating on the motor nameplate. If the motor is plugged into an extension cord of insufficient amperage rating it will have less power. If the motor is on the same electrical circuit as the lighting, they will dim when the motor is under a heavy load. Table saws should have their own circuit for best performance.
 

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carpenter
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Up until recently I have not had any real space to hone my craft. In July, I started building a shed. But more than just a shed. It is my happy place. It’s foundation is concrete and it’s bones are pallets. Interior is cedar and exterior is smart board with cedar accents. The best part is I have gotten a General table saw model 150. For a song. But I am unsure of how to connect the side rails and clamp. Not even sure if that is what they are called. If anyone has information one the General 150. I would love to hear it. Thanks
Welcome Wendy
 
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