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i got the 2" and 1.5" i was told them are the basic sizes to get started with. there is also a thing ya hook to a router and i think it cuts all diffrent sizes.

bob again awsome work, i cant wait to get my shop set up so i can start making some sawdust (girlfriends says not till the house is set up and were moved in though!)
 

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What are the most used sizes need in making tenons for log furniture
That depends entirely on the size of the material you are going to work with. The tenon should be at least 1/2 to 2/3 the size of the log or branch you are building with. If you decide to get into working with log or branch projects get yourself some Forstner bits to match the tenons. They give you a nice flat bottomed hole to seat the tenon into.

As the tenon cutters are pretty pricey figure out the size of material you want to work with and buy those sizes to start. A complete set is very expensive. You can check out pricing and sizes at Lee Valley Tools.

Gerry

Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thanks guys for all the nice comments. Sorry it took me so long to get back here. I was in Illinois on a job for a few months and then we moved to a new house here in Cedar Springs, Mi when I got back. The best news is that the garage is the new shop and we don't have the storefront anymore. The local retail market wasn't worth it. But the internet business is taking off. Yee Ha !

Chevy asked about rocking loveseats. I haven't made one yet but it sounds like a cool project. The rocker had a 24" wide seat so a love seat rocker wouldn't have to be much bigger. Definately doable. Drop me an e-mail at [email protected] and let me know when you can come up.

As to tenon sizes. 1 1/2" and 2" are most common for log furniture. BUt I also use 3/4", 1", 1 1/4", 2 1/2" and 3". It all depends on the size of the log. I attach mine to a 3/4" drill that is mounted on a slide. The other end of the frame has a self centering clamp to hold the log. I also use a Y shaped roller stand to hold the far end of longer logs. It really makes cutting tenons a breeze.

Forstner bits are the perfect tool for the mortise. I get mine from a traveling tool show that comes to town twice a year.

Keep up the great work and keep posting pictures.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Expensive tools

Those tenon tools are very expensive!
They sure are but when I can make a bed and get $800 for it, well it goes a long way toward a return on investment. Then there was the couch and 2 chairs, the log railing on another customers staircase, several rockers, a dozen other beds, bar stools, and then the 8 chairs around a dining room table trimmed in log.

Yep, they are expensive but the returns are out there, whether you are selling your creations or just outfitting your own home. The alternative is to become very proficient with a draw knife. And trust me on this one, after you've made a bed using a draw knife for the tenons you will know just how inexpensive those tenon cutter really are. When you compare a few minutes to many many hours, it's no contest.

Don't get me wrong though, I value my draw knife as much as the tenon cutters. It is invaluable for removing difficult bark and trim work. Just make sure youe get a really good one that will hold an edge like a good knife should.
 
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