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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Personally, I probably could use a math class (or two), but a wood carving class changed the quality of my work more than anything. It wasn't the carving itself though, it was the sharpening techniques they taught. I've been able to carry this knowledge over to sharpening my other hand tools. It's nice to know if my razor gets dull, I could shave with my chisels. :eek:

Just curious what classes others have found helpful?
 

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I've never taken any classes. I don't live in a very metropolitan area and don't know of any that are available.

Honestly I don't know that I could. I've never been the studious type.
 

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I've taken classes from David Marks but that's about it. Classes are helpful and like you you learn things that weren't part of the class itself.
 

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I've never had any woodworking classes either. I could use a dozen or so.

dwwright brings up sharpening - I'm sure most of us here are familiar with the Scary Sharp System, but maybe not everyone. The original Scary Sharp link is now defunct but I found a copy of it and it the link above.
Rockler carries their version, but you can assemble your own system cheaper.

Now as much as I love the SCary Sharp method (nothing gets a tool sharper IMO) THIS SYSTEM looks like the cats' meow by taking Scary Sharp a notch up. dwwright, ydid they cover anything like this in your sharpening class? Anyone ever seen it before? I haven't until I was just looking for the SS link. i have to try it though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They actually used a leather strop wheel that was about 6" in diameter and a cloth buffing wheel, in my class. I bought a SS clone last year at the wood show here in KC but have yet to give it a try. I did try it out when I was there though and it worked pretty good. The main thing was keeping the speed down on the grinder/buffer so that you didn't burn the edge. They were shooting for about 1300 - 1700 rpms (depending on wheel size).

Another good class was a raised panel class I did at woodcrafts, just covered some good setup tips. Like keeping previous samples around to set your heights from.

Also took a carving class through another local supplier on sign carving. The guy used the plung router to clear away waste from the carving to save a bunch of time and get the carvings different levels brought out. Also didn't know the differences between the spiral bits til then and what they were used for.

By the way the first wood carving class was through a community education class that the local wood carving club did.
 
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