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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have built a table that has a 1 inch lip around the outside and I want to fill in the center with a clear finish. I was wanting to know what would be good to use. It will have to be something that dries clear so that I will be able to see that grain in the wood. Does anyone have any ideas?
 

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johnep
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Have seen this used to great efect in bars, one in Bermuda had coins embedded while another in Trinidad had a fill which seemed about an inch thick and was on rustic timber. (Bel Air Piarco airport).

johnep
 

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I use the same stuff that cabinetman linked to. Not the same brand but it comes in the same looking jugs. 1 to 1 ratio. It's fairly easy to use just follow the directions and be sure to have a dust and bug free enviroment to do it in. I can't tell you how many bugs are stuck in a top here and there. It is very slow cure which allows it to self level once you get it close.
 

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johnep
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top finish

When brush painting a car, I was advised to choose a damp day so that not too much dust flying about. Commercial operators would have a specially created dust free area.

In the past I have sprayed the air with fine mist of water before starting to try to clear particles in the air. wear a cheap face mask like a surgeons, move slowly, anything to try to avoid raising the dust.
johnep
 

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I use the same as link above.

I was in a bar in Kent Ohio once, and they have a real thixk epoxy pour top. It was rilled with suspended bubble trails. Like a line of very fine bubbles coming from the wood up through the surface of the epoxy. I have no idea how this resulted, but Ive always wondered. Wet wood maybe? But i wrote that theory off thinking that any moisture would exit through the bottom side via the method of least resistance. But after reading that web page, it appears that they could have resulted from the lack of a seal coat.
 

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I use the same as link above.

I was in a bar in Kent Ohio once, and they have a real thixk epoxy pour top. It was rilled with suspended bubble trails. Like a line of very fine bubbles coming from the wood up through the surface of the epoxy. I have no idea how this resulted, but Ive always wondered. Wet wood maybe? But i wrote that theory off thinking that any moisture would exit through the bottom side via the method of least resistance. But after reading that web page, it appears that they could have resulted from the lack of a seal coat.
Bullhart, my brother and I created this effect on purpose once. We used an electric heater under the table top to heat the wood after the pouron was in place. As soon as we saw the first bubble appear we removed the heat. They kept appearing for a while due to the stored heat. We got lucky because the look was exactly what the buyer was looking for.

Ed
 

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Old School
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When brush painting a car, I was advised to choose a damp day so that not too much dust flying about.

I'm trying to understand what you are talking about. Did you mean "air brush", or paint brush?

Brought back visions of when I was in high school and there was some guy who actually painted his car with a roller. It was a sight to see.
 

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I'm trying to understand what you are talking about. Did you mean "air brush", or paint brush?

Brought back visions of when I was in high school and there was some guy who actually painted his car with a roller. It was a sight to see.
See it every day in this neck of the woods...lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the help guys. When I am done I will post pics to let everyone see. This is one of my first wood projects and deff not the last.
 
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