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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some suggestions as to how best to handle some hardwood I just came into for next to nothing. I moved to the country and was looking for some kindling wood to start fires in the coal stove in our new home.

A new aquaintance from my new workplace suggested a business down the road from where he lives, they sell large 4' X 4' by six ft. high boxes of cutoffs from their custom milled hardwood and custom hardwood trim business.

I purchased a box, dumped out by their forklift into my pick up and took it home. As I unloaded it I noticed that there was a great deal of red oak and cherry trim and shorts, along with some maple and walnut. All kinds of configurations on the trim, some simple roundover, to complex, and on the straights from 3/4" square up to 1" X 6" dimensioned lumber from about 6" thru about 18".

Even some of what looks like purplehart, but mostly cherry, maple and red oak.

I separated out about three plastic storage bins full of the longest and best before I put the rest in the bin to be burned.

Did I mention that I paid $10.00 for the box of hardwood. Don't know how much is there but it sure put a hurtin' on my Chev. full size pick up shocks.

Now for the problem, many of the pieces are very slightly tapered on one edge, like they were the end of a long piece that was sniped in a planer.

How can I best clean up this stuff so that I can use it for building copies of antique clocks (repros).

I think it is too short to safely run it thru my planer - would a wide belt sander work?

Haven't got my shop up and running yet, but I plan on going down next week and get another box of this stuff. I WILL find a way to use it.
 

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I've run stuff as short as about 10-12 " thru my Delta 12 1/2" planer. there might still be some snipe.... but a Widebelt would work too.

No where do you live????? (you might not be all that far from me)
 

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A wide belt or drum sander should work, but also a joiner will clean one side and is a nice tool for your shop:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions, I have a delta planer so will try that for some of the longer pieces. A friend's shop has a wide belt sander, so will try that as well when I am able to get back to N.J. with some of the stuff. (can't afford one right now myself). The hand planer sounds like a good idea, except I've never had any experience with hand tools, might be a perfect excuse to purchase one and try it.
As for where I live, I am in Potter County, Pa, in Bingham township.
 

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I unhesitatingly run short pieces through my tablesaw to straighten them up. Having said that, I hasten to add, I always use hold downs, push sticks and whatever else will help to preserve my manual digits.


d.
 
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