Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any one out there ever work with string inlay. I need to repair some and I'd like avice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thomas;
What can I say, the inlay is 1/16" satinwood. The inlay is set about 1/2" from the edge of all the pieces. For an example the buffet is 2ft D by 5ft L by 3ft H. The top has a 1/16" satinwood line 1/2" in from the edge allthe way around. Their are 5 drawers each drawer front has a 1/16" line 1/2" infrom the edge all the way around.
Basicly all of the surfaces have been inlayed with a 1/16" line 1/2" in from the edge.

I just realised why you asked for more information. My first post was in INTRODUCTIONS, you only saw the second post. Let me start over.

Hi I'm Pete.
I live in South Carolina now but have traveled most of the world.
I worked with wood as a hobby for about 45yrs. I've done almost every thing from making some furniture to building a house.

I inharited a mohgany dinning room set with satinwood inlay.
I'm starting to restore it and need to repair the inlay. Some of it is lifting some is missing. About 25% of the inlay needs work. I've just never done any inlay work and all the information I can find deals with new work.
This dinning roomset as made in 1915/17 so I'm a little timmid.
How do I procide, Do I remove all the inlay or just the bad part?
How do I remove the inlay and what glue do I use to put it back?

Any ideas?
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,027 Posts
If the table is as old as you say, it's likely the inlay was glued in with hide glue. You can heat it up with a heat gun and the glue will release. What I do is assess the damaged inlay and if need be just remove what's bad. At 1/16", it's pretty small, and hard to handle. I use an X-Acto knife with a #11 blade, and scarf cut what will remain, and do a matching scarf on the repair. That knife setup can be used to work the veneer out. You have to be careful not to damage the border wood.

If you remove it all or just parts, you'll have to clean out the area before gluing new veneer. You could use yellow glue, or hot hide glue, and apply with a wood toothpick. With the color of Satinwood, the old may not look like the new.





.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,718 Posts
If the table is as old as you say, it's likely the inlay was glued in with hide glue. You can heat it up with a heat gun and the glue will release. What I do is assess the damaged inlay and if need be just remove what's bad. At 1/16", it's pretty small, and hard to handle. I use an X-Acto knife with a #11 blade, and scarf cut what will remain, and do a matching scarf on the repair. That knife setup can be used to work the veneer out. You have to be careful not to damage the border wood.

If you remove it all or just parts, you'll have to clean out the area before gluing new veneer. You could use yellow glue, or hot hide glue, and apply with a wood toothpick. With the color of Satinwood, the old may not look like the new.










.
I totally agree here, also trying to match it can be difficult but not impossible just take your time
 
  • Like
Reactions: pete56
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top