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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building some kitchen cabinets for my wife and the pictures below are how she wants me to finish them. I can do something like this with an airbrush (I custom paint automotive), I have seen layering with stain,... but is there a different way to accomplish this with color?

Thanks for your help.:thumbsup:
 

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The only way I've seen that done is with a technique called dry brush. You basically paint the cabinets and doors the dark brown background color first. Then with a coarse brush with as little paint on it as possible brush the blue top color on. The coarse brush kinda gives it the sanded look as if you tried to sand the blue off and got to the underlying color. Try it out on some scrap wood. It takes a bit of practice to not have too much paint on the brush. It is why it is called dry brush. I would use an oil based enamel to give you more open time with it. If you have a spot where you have the brush too wet you can just wipe it off with a rag with some mineral spirits and do it over. The hard part is getting it uniform over the entire kitchen. It's good to step back from time to time and take a look see.
 

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bzguy
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You picked a challenging project for your first woodwork paint-job, looks like at least 4 step finish.
But if you paint (spray) cars you're miles ahead of other beginners.
I'd sand, spray/prime with high-build primer lacquer, sand smooth, then spray everything the solid green.
I use lacquer for all interior work, quick drying time, easy to sand.
Then use a combination of brushing and rag-wiping the other "coppery/brown"? color in spots as shown.
I'd use latex for this, you can take a wet rag and thin/spread it around until you get the desired effect without removing the green lacquer.
Finish up with clear flat or satin lacquer over everything once dry, sanding between coats.
Good luck, nice looking in the picture!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
ok, I appreciate the help......sounds kinda like when I woodgrain on metal.....couple of different ways to do it, but yea, on metal you can drag a dry brush with dark grain color then airbrush knots after you have sprayed a root beer (wood color) good wood grain effect. Sounds like I need to incorporate some of custom paint techniques to this......just wasn't sure about doing it on wood.

when you say high build primer do you mean like a gray automotive laquer high build primer?

Thank ya'll for your help...can't wait to try this.
 

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Old School
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You picked a challenging project for your first woodwork paint-job, looks like at least 4 step finish.
But if you paint (spray) cars you're miles ahead of other beginners.
I'd sand, spray/prime with high-build primer lacquer, sand smooth, then spray everything the solid green.
I use lacquer for all interior work, quick drying time, easy to sand.
Then use a combination of brushing and rag-wiping the other "coppery/brown"? color in spots as shown.
I'd use latex for this, you can take a wet rag and thin/spread it around until you get the desired effect without removing the green lacquer.
Finish up with clear flat or satin lacquer over everything once dry, sanding between coats.
Good luck, nice looking in the picture!
+1. :yes: I would paint the lighter color first and let dry. Then dry brush the darker color.






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