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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am about to start my first wood project and I am thinking of building a cradle for my soon to be borned child.

I am following this tutorial: http://www.binkyswoodworking.com/BeckysCradle.php
but I can not figure out what kind of wood he is using (top right picture). In the plans that I have bought it is specified ash, but it do not look like ash..or?

Best regards,

CM
 

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Hello all,

I am about to start my first wood project and I am thinking of building a cradle for my soon to be borned child.

I am following this tutorial: http://www.binkyswoodworking.com/BeckysCradle.php
but I can not figure out what kind of wood he is using (top right picture). In the plans that I have bought it is specified ash, but it do not look like ash..or?

Best regards,

CM
Black walnut the whole project
 

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.

I am following this tutorial: http://www.binkyswoodworking.com/BeckysCradle.php
but I can not figure out what kind of wood he is using (top right picture). In the plans that I have bought it is specified ash, but it do not look like ash..or?

Best regards,

CM
The stock is Black Walnut, and it's mentioned that Black Walnut dowels were used. Not many woods look like Black Walnut. Ash would be very light in comparison. For the build and assembly, I don't agree with using biscuits. I also think I would rather use an aliphatic resin/PVA glue throughout, as the joints would be a snug fit.





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Ok, thanks! I will try to find some black walnut.
LOL, Coffee don't feel obligated to purchase black walnut just because we say it is such, If you want a lighter colored wood such as ash or maple or birch, etc, then by all means you can substitute it for the more costly walnut ok? Now of course if your looking to make the ash or other a walnut color in the end, then the choice of walnut would be best in that instance, if not then don't even bother.

The "plans" are meant for how to shape, prepare and build and assemble, it is your free choice to use whatever materials you prefer, not the authors nor ours, ok?

What you might want to keep in mind while forming the pieces needed for the project is what type of finish you will apply, many times it is easier to apply the dye/pigment before gluing it up, in your case, depending on the final look your after color-wise, that may be a wise thing to do.

If you like we can lead you through the process once your ready for assembly, you will also need to keep your scraps for samples so that you know how it will look before going through those steps on the actual piece ok? With me that's just a given as with others here, saves a lot of headaches in the long run ok?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hehe. Of course I know that every type of wood can be used:) I just like the greyish finish that I see in the picture. It seems like black walnut is hard to find here in Norway.. so I might end up using oak and use some dye.

I'll turn back here when I am ready for the assembly. Thanks Chemmy.
 

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Hehe. Of course I know that every type of wood can be used:) I just like the greyish finish that I see in the picture. It seems like black walnut is hard to find here in Norway.. so I might end up using oak and use some dye.

I'll turn back here when I am ready for the assembly. Thanks Chemmy.
Dyes a great choice, water-base especially. Are you using Arti's brand there, or another?

By the way only fresh walnut looks that color dry, the "grayish" color you see no longer is present when wet. On top of that it naturally turns a mellow orangish brown over time on it's own. Oak at least if you mix a grayish color stain to apply to it will stay that color for the most part, especially if finished with non yellowing coatings like acrylics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A brand named "Jotun" is a quite common supplier of paint and stain etc. here.

How long should something like this dry before it can be used?

Btw thanks for the info about walnut and color!
 

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A brand named "Jotun" is a quite common supplier of paint and stain etc. here.

How long should something like this dry before it can be used?

Btw thanks for the info about walnut and color!
Jotun, hmmm...... are they a manufacturer or just a distributor of dye?

Normally water dyes [depending on the temperature and humidity] and whether they contain any secondary chemical staining materials [as Arti's does], you can coat over in from 4-8 hours. If Arti's it can take or you should allow 24 hours or more, depending on the secondary chemicals used [potassium dichromate/ferrous sulfate/etc.]

Here we use mainly synthetic dyes that have no other chemical secondaries. so pretty standard to wait as said 4-8- hours, but can be reduced with alcohol or acetone or other fast evaporating solvents if faster drying is needed, many also use NGR or NFR types and skip using water all together.But the penetration is not as deep, but then most don't care as long as the color is there.

Old timer here, lol, so i still do it as was done in the beginning and brush it out till almost dry and leave, not wiping off which when done, waste little material and assures better and deeper color penetration and retention. In fact I'm not sure anyone does this anymore? do you do that there? :detective:

PS: The last pic of your project showing the baby in the cradle is what the walnut he used would look like finished natural, as you can see, all the grey color is gone. i know it's natural and not stained because of his mentioning of not worry about a little bit of epoxy film being left on the wood and not showing when the clear coats were applied, had he stained it the epoxy would have not allowed the stain to penetrate the wood and would have remained lighter, one thing I'm hoping to help you avoid by staining your oak a similar color ok?
 
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