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I agree with Steve, on the riser height. I’m thinking about carrying stuff up and down, maybe 6 or 6 1/2’” is even better?
I can't find where Steve was recommending a 6" riser? I had posted a photo of my 7" riser, maybe was that it?
 

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I've checked it again but I can't come up with anything that would be code compliant....
Not saying a new set couldn't be built there (8"riser, 9-3/4"treads) but I can't recommend anything (wink *) that will properly fit within the constraints of your space.

Also.... When laying out your stringer cuts : include your finished flooring thickness in your total rise.
You'll do a reduction of the tread thickness to the heel of the stringer, but from that thickness subtract the thickness of the finish flooring :
IE: 1-1/8" thick tread
(-1/4"finish floor)
=. 7/8" drop cut /reduction from heel.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I've checked it again but I can't come up with anything that would be code compliant....
Not saying a new set couldn't be built there (8"riser, 9-3/4"treads) but I can't recommend anything (wink *) that will properly fit within the constraints of your space.

Also.... When laying out your stringer cuts : include your finished flooring thickness in your total rise.
You'll do a reduction of the tread thickness to the heel of the stringer, but from that thickness subtract the thickness of the finish flooring :
IE: 1-1/8" thick tread
(-1/4"finish floor)
=. 7/8" drop cut /reduction from heel.
What did you think of my suggestion of notching the stringers back into the second floor to gain more run?
 

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What did you think of my suggestion of notching the stringers back into the second floor to gain more run?
If it was on site, that would be the route I would take to achieve compliance. We'd remove and reframe a portion of the floor to get the stairwell opening to the dimensions we'd need to get headroom clearance and a comfortable run.
As it is right now there's sufficient height to achieve a comfortable riser height between 7 and 8"...with 8" bordering on the unnecessary.
That being said... I don't know the site conditions; meaning an enlarged stairwell could take away space from the floor above in a negative way.
I don't remember reading where this stairwell was.... I should probably go back and read it again.
 

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Hi all, I’m new here and new to cutting stair stringers. Any help would be appreciated as I’m going up and down my basement by ladder and hearing earfuls from my wife.
I watched hours of YouTube diy and read countless number of articles on cutting out and building my own staircase.

This past weekend I demolished my basement staircase and cut out my first template.

The total rise is 95.75 – .25 for the floor so I used 95.5 and 8 as the rise per step given the space I have available. Each tread will be 9.5”. I cut the stringer out with treads at 9 and the risers at 8. There will be a .5” overhang on the treads.

After making the template I set it on the headboard and the stringer is tilting a bit forward so there’s about a 1/8 gap on the top of the stringer leading me to believe I may have cut the bottom riser 1/8 too much? But when I had my wife lift up the bottom of the stringer she had to bring it up several inches for the stringer to be flush with the head board. I’m using Simpson strong tie joint connectors, cutting a total of 4 stringers and attaching them to the headboard so a total of 10 treads and 11 risers on the stringer.
Is 1/8” gap acceptable at the top of the riser where it connects to the headboard?

or can I just compensate and cut 1/8” less material on the riser on the next stringer cut? Or better yet cut a second piece of plywood and nail it on the headboard which should reduce the space between the stringer and headboard?

Any advice would be extremely appreciate I would be very grateful. Have a wonderful thanksgiving.
-Aaron
I approached stairs a bit different. I start with my height and find out how many risers there will be making sure I fall between 6-1/2" and 7-1/2" finished floor to finished floor. I then calculate my landing area based on how many treads that will be. There will always be one less tread than riser. If I have to hit a specific landing area I tweak the tread depth or number of treads to make sure I get there not getting past 7-3/4" riser. You will also have to make sure that on any given tread you have 6'8" of clearance to the ceiling above and stairs must be a minimum 36" wide. Also keep in mind that open risers greater than 4" are not permitted.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I approached stairs a bit different. I start with my height and find out how many risers there will be making sure I fall between 6-1/2" and 7-1/2" finished floor to finished floor. I then calculate my landing area based on how many treads that will be. There will always be one less tread than riser. If I have to hit a specific landing area I tweak the tread depth or number of treads to make sure I get there not getting past 7-3/4" riser. You will also have to make sure that on any given tread you have 6'8" of clearance to the ceiling above and stairs must be a minimum 36" wide. Also keep in mind that open risers greater than 4" are not permitted.
That would work in "normal" situations, but in this case with such specific limitations, the practical approaches we have suggested won't fit the parameters here.
Limited run, overhead interference, maybe limitations on the second floor restricting moving the entire stairs in towards the hall/room ... who knows?
 

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Might put some padding on the headspace just in case. That can really knock you off your balance when you hit your head. I was walking through a customers attic onetime and someone put a collar tie just about eye level and I was looking down watching the rafters. When I hit that collar tie I ended up falling through their kitchen ceiling all the way to the floor. Fortunately I was suppose to remove the popcorn texture anyway so it wasn't that big of a deal.
In 25 years? Not sure I wanna worry about it
Like I said before, tall people rarely bump their heads. They're always on the lookout 😉
 

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I approached stairs a bit different. I start with my height and find out how many risers there will be making sure I fall between 6-1/2" and 7-1/2" finished floor to finished floor. I then calculate my landing area based on how many treads that will be. There will always be one less tread than riser. If I have to hit a specific landing area I tweak the tread depth or number of treads to make sure I get there not getting past 7-3/4" riser. You will also have to make sure that on any given tread you have 6'8" of clearance to the ceiling above and stairs must be a minimum 36" wide. Also keep in mind that open risers greater than 4" are not permitted.
[/QUOT
The women and children of my family are over 6ft. 😂
But we work with what we have. None of my 3 steps have 6ft of headroom vertical, one of the idiosyncrasies of living in a 150 yr old house. Can't say that I've ever smacked my head either.
In an old home that is fine. When doing a renovation if you leave the existing staircase and it does not meet code, but met code when built, you will usually be grandfathered in. If you replace a stair case it must meet the new codes. All is good until you try to sell your home and it can't get c/o or someone gets hurt. I would do whatever needed to meet code, even if it is my house and I am not pulling a permit.
 

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In case they missed the bottom paragraph, which is excellent advice. JMO.
Quoting:
In an old home that is fine. When doing a renovation if you leave the existing staircase and it does not meet code, but met code when built, you will usually be grandfathered in. If you replace a stair case it must meet the new codes. All is good until you try to sell your home and it can't get c/o or someone gets hurt. I would do whatever needed to meet code, even if it is my house and I am not pulling a permit.
 
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other than a smattering of city codes, there was no building code in michigan until 1973. i can trace my original house as far back as 1872. no building codes back then, the building survived or it didn't. making my stairs code would cut off the hallway above them.
as far as the op, his home is 1952, unless the house is in a city with codes that far back, anything goes, even if he rebuilds the stairs. i've asked why the op isn't copying the original stringers, that would be the correct way to grandfather them. creating a new set of steps not to current code, might be pushing the grandfather statute.
 

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other than a smattering of city codes, there was no building code in michigan until 1973. i can trace my original house as far back as 1872. no building codes back then, the building survived or it didn't. making my stairs code would cut off the hallway above them.
as far as the op, his home is 1952, unless the house is in a city with codes that far back, anything goes, even if he rebuilds the stairs. i've asked why the op isn't copying the original stringers, that would be the correct way to grandfather them. creating a new set of steps not to current code, might be pushing the grandfather statute.
To the best of my knowledge every state has adopted the UCC, most in full. Some have made modifications for their particular environment.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Typically the treads are let into dados on the stringers and then wedged in place so they can't move or squeak.
Another version used on decks and exteriors is to notch the stringers. There's a bracket system that I just discovered that would make for an easier construction:

I often wondered how it would work to just use blocks cut to duplicate the notches and nail or glue and screw them on, AND if that would pass code? That way, the stringer is a solid board no notches, so stronger. It would use 2X more material, so not cost effective unless using scrap lengths. The risers aides in stiffening the tread and prevents it from sagging, an important feature!
This article shows cleats being used to support the treads:
 

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In case they missed the bottom paragraph, which is excellent advice. JMO.
Quoting:
In an old home that is fine. When doing a renovation if you leave the existing staircase and it does not meet code, but met code when built, you will usually be grandfathered in. If you replace a stair case it must meet the new codes. All is good until you try to sell your home and it can't get c/o or someone gets hurt. I would do whatever needed to meet code, even if it is my house and I am not pulling a permit.
The only problem is where he lives the 8" rise is within code. If it were me I would make the stairway more comfortable even if the stairs extended past the sheetrock column. Not being there it's difficult to say what other problems might arise from doing that though. I know there wouldn't be enough headspace but that could be removed and replaced with a smaller steel member which would allow for more headspace.
 

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Any variation from the desired height will tilt the stair treads which can also be a safety hazard. If you have only cut one, it may be wise to lay it out again and eat your loses so far considering the stairs will be steep to start with.
According to the building code their can not be a deviation greater than 3/8" between the highest riser and the lowest riser.
 

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for new construction, yes. but there is no law that requires old construction to be updated to the new code. or i'd be screwed
I'd have to look in my code book (even though mine would be irrevelant to your area), but I think we are only permitted to repair to the original state, but replacements must be built to current code.
If it's not a code requirement, it is definitely a municipal requirement (in my area).

I'm hoping the op updates some time soon.
 

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I'd have to look in my code book
please do. unless you know it as fact, don't tell the guy he needs to build it to current code. i realize your in canada, but down here taking of property is illegal. no old house is to current code in either country. codes change every couple of years, updating houses to the newest code would be cost prohibitive, you'd never be able to get a mortgage on any building. houses built up to the 70s have 2 wire plugs, narrow doors, steep stairs, balusters too wide; it's all legal. my house is ballooned framed, very dangerous in a fire. but it's legal.
new cars are built every year. adding air bags and crumple zones classic vehicles would cause a riot anywhere. nope we won't license your 2015 cuz it doesn't have rear camera?
 

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please do. unless you know it as fact, don't tell the guy he needs to build it to current code. i realize your in canada, but down here taking of property is illegal. no old house is to current code in either country. codes change every couple of years, updating houses to the newest code would be cost prohibitive, you'd never be able to get a mortgage on any building. houses built up to the 70s have 2 wire plugs, narrow doors, steep stairs, balusters too wide; it's all legal. my house is ballooned framed, very dangerous in a fire. but it's legal.
new cars are built every year. adding air bags and crumple zones classic vehicles would cause a riot anywhere. nope we won't license your 2015 cuz it doesn't have rear camera?
Allow me to paraphrase my previous post for clarity:
In my area, replacements must be built to code as a matter of professional integrity.. I've not yet been able to locate a specific code requirement to satisfy your request.
Simply put, I offered up nothing to the original conversation, and also never implicitly stated that the op was required to rebuild his stairs to code.
 
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