Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
What is your "RUN" for this stairway?
I can't find that in the posts or replies.
As a senior citizen, I would request that you NOT have a rise of 8" it's too much for the elderly.
Also have the widest tread possible for safety concerns.
These are some stairs up from the house to the shop. Notice the riser is 7" and the tread is 11 3/4".
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: BigJim and Aaron23

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
The home is built in 1954. The run is 104.5”, 9.5” treads x11

Just given the available space, 7” risers would result in about 10-15” in additional stringer length and the stringer would sit 10-15” into the room. I definitely understand the reason for 7, just space wise it’s not feasible.
Just being "creative" here but, what if the top thread was set back into the second floor "landing" to gain that extra run.
I've seen it done many times and it doesn't seem to present any issues, but I'm not a finish carpenter, so take my advice with caution!
@BigJim may have the answer?

Have you used the online stair calculators:
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
I agree with Steve, on the riser height. I’m thinking about carrying stuff up and down, maybe 6 or 6 1/2’” is even better?
I can't find where Steve was recommending a 6" riser? I had posted a photo of my 7" riser, maybe was that it?
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
I've checked it again but I can't come up with anything that would be code compliant....
Not saying a new set couldn't be built there (8"riser, 9-3/4"treads) but I can't recommend anything (wink *) that will properly fit within the constraints of your space.

Also.... When laying out your stringer cuts : include your finished flooring thickness in your total rise.
You'll do a reduction of the tread thickness to the heel of the stringer, but from that thickness subtract the thickness of the finish flooring :
IE: 1-1/8" thick tread
(-1/4"finish floor)
=. 7/8" drop cut /reduction from heel.
What did you think of my suggestion of notching the stringers back into the second floor to gain more run?
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
I approached stairs a bit different. I start with my height and find out how many risers there will be making sure I fall between 6-1/2" and 7-1/2" finished floor to finished floor. I then calculate my landing area based on how many treads that will be. There will always be one less tread than riser. If I have to hit a specific landing area I tweak the tread depth or number of treads to make sure I get there not getting past 7-3/4" riser. You will also have to make sure that on any given tread you have 6'8" of clearance to the ceiling above and stairs must be a minimum 36" wide. Also keep in mind that open risers greater than 4" are not permitted.
That would work in "normal" situations, but in this case with such specific limitations, the practical approaches we have suggested won't fit the parameters here.
Limited run, overhead interference, maybe limitations on the second floor restricting moving the entire stairs in towards the hall/room ... who knows?
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
In case they missed the bottom paragraph, which is excellent advice. JMO.
Quoting:
In an old home that is fine. When doing a renovation if you leave the existing staircase and it does not meet code, but met code when built, you will usually be grandfathered in. If you replace a stair case it must meet the new codes. All is good until you try to sell your home and it can't get c/o or someone gets hurt. I would do whatever needed to meet code, even if it is my house and I am not pulling a permit.
 
  • Like
Reactions: asevereid

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
Typically the treads are let into dados on the stringers and then wedged in place so they can't move or squeak.
Another version used on decks and exteriors is to notch the stringers. There's a bracket system that I just discovered that would make for an easier construction:

I often wondered how it would work to just use blocks cut to duplicate the notches and nail or glue and screw them on, AND if that would pass code? That way, the stringer is a solid board no notches, so stronger. It would use 2X more material, so not cost effective unless using scrap lengths. The risers aides in stiffening the tread and prevents it from sagging, an important feature!
This article shows cleats being used to support the treads:
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
The OP said:
This past weekend I demolished my basement staircase and cut out my first template.
He didn't say why he demolished the stairs, but what if they had just deteriorated to the point they were unsafe?
Would making new ones force him into building them to the latest codes?
Can he build a different riser and run combination IF it would fit the existing parameters, especially the limited run?
Could he set the stars back into the upstairs floor, IF that would be acceptable to him without code violations or upgrading?
Seems like these questions needed to be raised and answered at the start rather than having all this conjecture along the way.
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,632 Posts
So, if I understand you, that 21 AMP generator can power any appliances needed to "run" your house up to it's maximum output of 21 AMPs, possibly with a brief overload. The 30 AMP breaker will probably never trip running on the generator because the load will stall out the generator first?
The 30 AMP shop panel has the "capacity" of 200 AMPs but the "load" can't exceed 30 AMPs or it will trip the breaker. This doesn't happen because you never run all the machines at the same time. My 100 AMP shop sub panel is much the same. There's is a whole lot more "capacity" in breakers, than there ever will be in "load" at any given time. Even with a 22 AMP space heater and a 3 HP planer running with the all the lights on, it doesn't even come close to a 100 AMP load.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top