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Hi guys (and gals i suppose),

I've got a house that was built in the 40's and a few of the doors have a similar problem. After many years, the screws holding the door hinges to the frame are starting to wiggle, presumably because the wood around the screws is deteriorating. I've tried replacing the screws (which look like #6) with a #8 screw, but the larger size of the screw heads interfere with the hinge closing completely.

Any suggestions on how to solve this problem?

Thanks in Advance!
 

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I've done this repair by gluing in a dowel, chopping it off with a chisel and re-inserting the screw. Last one I did was 4 years ago and no problems since.
 

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No Longer Here, BY CHOICE
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I would drill the screw hole out and glue in a plug. If you use dowels, youll be screwing into end grain which dosnt tend to hold screws very well.
 

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Old School
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Hi guys (and gals i suppose),

I've got a house that was built in the 40's and a few of the doors have a similar problem. After many years, the screws holding the door hinges to the frame are starting to wiggle, presumably because the wood around the screws is deteriorating. I've tried replacing the screws (which look like #6) with a #8 screw, but the larger size of the screw heads interfere with the hinge closing completely.

Any suggestions on how to solve this problem?

Thanks in Advance!
A #6 sounds pretty small for a passage door hinge. Most hinges are packed with a #9 x 1" screw. Maybe the screw choice you have is an oversized head. You could try a different screw, preferably a coarse thread screw but longer.

If you don't have a plug cutter, you can chisel off some face grain pegs and pare them if necessary to fit. Glue them in and pilot the hole for the screws you will use.






.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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A #6 sounds pretty small for a passage door hinge. Most hinges are packed with a #9 x 1" screw. Maybe the screw choice you have is an oversized head. You could try a different screw, preferably a coarse thread screw but longer.

If you don't have a plug cutter, you can chisel off some face grain pegs and pare them if necessary to fit. Glue them in and pilot the hole for the screws you will use.
I have to agree with Mike. Behind the door jamb there is a space about 1/2" and then the framing 2x4. Screws 2-1/2 or 3 inches will do wonders. The longer screws can assist in aligning a door that drags on the floor. It is amazing how much an 1/8 of a turn of the screw in the top hinge will lift the door bottom.

The #6 sounds like cabinet hinges. The solution is to remove the screws from the hinge. Re-drill the hole at 1/4". Then plug the hole with a 1/4" dowel and glue. (Use a modern glue like Tite Bond) Then re-drill with the appropriate size pilot drill for the screw.

Tip - Don't try to do all the screws at once. Do one in the hinge, re-install the hinge with the remaining screws and then move to the next hinge. The next day when the glue is dry drill the pilot hole for the screw using a Vix bit to start the hole. With the door securely held in place you can now repeat the process hinge by hinge for the remaining screws. This may take a bit longer but the door will remain perfectly aligned.
 

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McFeely's sells some long, small headed screws if you want to keep the original hinge plates. I've seen them on older house doors too. I've fixed many door problems with 3" screws, but be careful not to warp the casing when driving the screws into the framing.

Also, avoid dowels because in time, the screw will pull out of the end grain. Buy a plug cutter set and glue a plug into an oversized hole. If you place the plug carefully, no sanding is required. I always use poplar or maple for the plugs, since I always have some in the shop!
 

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Two separate paragraphs; two separate thoughts.
I should have made two separate posts for clarity, I suppose.

Anyway, if one intends to use the original screws, screw them into long grain not end grain.
 
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