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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ive rescued this amazing table from destruction. Someone screwed a piece of wood to the bottom for some crazy reason :huh: ?????????? ( I'm posting a pic, but I warn you, its disturbing!)
Its a Drexel Declaration in walnut. Ive refinished the table all but the leg bottoms, so far. First mistake was using Kwikwood, which I do like, but does NOT take stain. Second attempt was Elmers filler. Says stainable, but it just turns a dirty uneven dark color. Tried mixing the minwax walnut stain in with both fillers and then filling, but it didn't work either, was darker, but when I sanded it came right off. Im posting a pic of one of the legs with the kwikwood filler ( stain mix). I've been digging the filler out and trying different things, but nothing is working. Id really like to get a very close match on these legs, as its a valuable table. Thanks!!

p.s. each leg had an attempted nailing and then a predrilled hole clean through the leg. The filler inside the hole is pretty hard, but I can dig enough out to refill with something else. I cant even imagine someones reasoning for doing this??
 

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When doing that type repair I prefer using a shellac burn-in stick however it takes the burn-in knife which is probably only available to you by mail order. It's a hard colored stick that is melted into the void with a soldering iron. You just pick a stick that matches the lighter color of the wood. You can also melt with it another stick to match the color. Once filled to the lighter color you use a graining pen that matches the darker of the wood and draw the grain back on. It's kind of like a brown sharpie. You can achieve the same thing with wood putty by adding tinting color to natural wood putty to achieve the background color or you can leave it light and mix some oil based paint or artist oil paint and paint the putty the lighter color of the wood. When dry lightly sand it to make it smooth and use the graining pen to draw the grain back on. If you have some universal tinting color you can mix it with the finish you are using to color the putty also. once you have it colored in you can clearcoat over it. If you are using lacquers go easy with it. The solvents in lacquers will lift the shellac stick or oil based paint. If fact it is recommended you use a can of burn-in protector which is a barrier coat with shellac sticks. It would also help over oil based paint. I normally just mist a very light coat of lacquer. Enough to cover but not enough to eat on it.
 

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Thank you for all the information! I think I will go with the putty, the artist oil paints, then the graining pen. I wont be using any lacquer finish on this. When finished with the holes, I will touch up the bottom of legs and some stain,danish oil, then maybe a clear wax. Will any of these conflict with the putty?
 

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The artist oil paint may take a week or two to dry completely but there would be no problem putting danish oil and wax over the top. You might put some on a scrap piece of wood and at the time you get ready to apply the danish oil wipe it over the scrap piece first. If the artist paint isn't dry the solvents in the danish oil could remove the paint.
 

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Not that I'm in a rush although I am impatient, but is there any reason I can not use an acrylic paint mixed with the putty?
I have been checking out some tutorials, and reading info, and oil paints always mentioned. What happens when you use acrylic?
 

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My self I would use a artist brush a put a small amont of urathane on it a drip , and let it dry. Then after add a tint / stain to urathane that matches col , let it dry and buff out or blend it in gentle
 

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Not that I'm in a rush although I am impatient, but is there any reason I can not use an acrylic paint mixed with the putty?
I have been checking out some tutorials, and reading info, and oil paints always mentioned. What happens when you use acrylic?
You can use an acrylic paint on the putty spot as long as the surounding wood doesn't have a finish on it or you can keep the acrylic off the finished wood. The acrylic won't adhere to finished wood. The acrylic certainly will dry faster.
 
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