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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am finally in the market to purchase a decent table saw. I have been using freebies and hand-me-downs my entire life. This will be going in a walk out basement in a shop that is about 14×20. I am leaning towards saws that have a 50” fence. Will this be to much for that size shop?


I began me search looking at high end 110v saws. When I built the house I ran 4 2amp circuits to the basement. I was busy and didn’t consider that I may want some 220 down there. I may have an option of pulling 220 off the back up heat strip 50 amp circuit though. I just need to figure out how I am going do it.
During my 110v saw search I was pretty set on either the Steel City or the Jet Proshop. In all the similiar threads I kept seeing the grizzly 691 and the 1023 coming up. Grizzly is about 2 minutes up the road from my work, so I consider that a huge advantage over the other companies out there. I guess my question is are the 3hp saws from Jet, Delta, General, Powermatic, SawStop (ignoring the safety brake) really worth the almost double the price of the Griz? I am looking for a saw that will last me 20 years, if not the rest of my life. I will not be considering a used saw.
 

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Your thread title mentions 3HP, but in the description you mention 120V.

It is not practical to consider starting a 3HP motor on 120V. Can be done, but not recommended.

Grizzly make good machines. I live about 2 hours from the Muncy, PA warehouse and spent some time looking over the Grizzly table saws back in 2010. I ended up getting the new Delta Unisaw. At the time made in US. With Delta being sold to DeWalt and later a Taiwanese company, I have no idea if still being made in the US.

I felt the price difference was worth it to get a mostly US made saw, but this is a very personal decision. If I had not bought the Delta, I would likely have purchased one of the Grizzly saws.

I have the 36in fence version. I have space constraints in my shop, aka garage. Too many tools not enough floor space, so I did not have room for a 50in fence.

There are a few times I would have liked a 50in fence for the first cut on a full sheet of plywood, but this is very infrequent for me. I just use my straight edge and the circular saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your thread title mentions 3HP, but in the description you mention 120V.

It is not practical to consider starting a 3HP motor on 120V. Can be done, but not recommended.

Grizzly make good machines. I live about 2 hours from the Muncy, PA warehouse and spent some time looking over the Grizzly table saws back in 2010. I ended up getting the new Delta Unisaw. At the time made in US. With Delta being sold to DeWalt and later a Taiwanese company, I have no idea if still being made in the US.

I felt the price difference was worth it to get a mostly US made saw, but this is a very personal decision. If I had not bought the Delta, I would likely have purchased one of the Grizzly saws.

I have the 36in fence version. I have space constraints in my shop, aka garage. Too many tools not enough floor space, so I did not have room for a 50in fence.

There are a few times I would have liked a 50in fence for the first cut on a full sheet of plywood, but this is very infrequent for me. I just use my straight edge and the circular saw.
I was initially only looking at 110v saws. I have expanded my search to include 220v.

The unisaw website still says it is still made in the US. It is also 2 times the price of a compareable grizzly. So what makes these worth that much extra money?
 

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...Grizzly is about 2 minutes up the road from my work, so I consider that a huge advantage over the other companies out there. I guess my question is are the 3hp saws from Jet, Delta, General, Powermatic, SawStop (ignoring the safety brake) really worth the almost double the price of the Griz? I am looking for a saw that will last me 20 years, if not the rest of my life. I will not be considering a used saw.
Jet and General "International" are decent Asian importst that are pretty similar to the Grizzly, so that's an emphatic "no" IMHO unless you want dealer support, for which you pay a premium. Delta, the Canadian made General 350/650, SS, and Powermatic....maybe, if I was running them hard 24/7, but it's really a matter of opinion. For a hobbyist and even some commercial shops, Grizzly tends to offer the most bang for the buck if you're willing to be your own middleman. Take a look and decide for yourself.
 

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I agree, grizzly and steel city are both top notch saws that feature for feature compare fairly well to the "brand name" saws. The delta has some added cost as it has a branded fence, arguably the best fence ever made. However, the fences steel city and grizzly have are top notch as well. There is a nice feature of both hand wheels on the front of the new unisaws....worth much more? Not to me but that's preference.

It's my opinion that the saw stop is easily worth double...or more....and will be my next saw purchase.


Lastly....if your considering a grizzly, it might be worth your time to look over the spreadsheet I posted on the other table saw thread a few days ago....I do plan to add more saws to it soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I agree, grizzly and steel city are both top notch saws that feature for feature compare fairly well to the "brand name" saws. The delta has some added cost as it has a branded fence, arguably the best fence ever made. However, the fences steel city and grizzly have are top notch as well. There is a nice feature of both hand wheels on the front of the new unisaws....worth much more? Not to me but that's preference.

It's my opinion that the saw stop is easily worth double...or more....and will be my next saw purchase.


Lastly....if your considering a grizzly, it might be worth your time to look over the spreadsheet I posted on the other table saw thread a few days ago....I do plan to add more saws to it soon.
Thanks, I saw your sheet just before I posted here. Our local dealer is a joke. I went in there on friday and saw a warehouse full of old(new) saws rusting away.

 

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I reread your original post. No mention of your intention of use. If not for professional shop use I can't see a need for anything more than the Grizzly 1023 or 690. The price is good and so is the performance...and close to you. Wow!

Good luck in your search.
 

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I have a SawStop Contractors saw with a 36" table....if I was in the market for a cabinet saw, there would be no question that it would be a SawStop.....frankly, mine is an excellent quality saw, and I don't think you can set aside the fact that it does have the safety feature....while nothing can ever be 100% safe, it does add a wide margin in that realm.....jmho.....
 

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You know what you want, but that is a big saw for a small shop. My shop is small 12X 25 I have a Delta contractors saw now for 23 years and never needed or wanted anything else. Working in a small shop I built skids under it and being a lighter saw I can move it some what. I started out running it on 110 but changed over to 220. I use Forest saw blades and can't ask for a better cut. If I have a 4X8 sheet of anything I need to cut I mage a jig that that fits my work bench and cut it with my circular saw.
 

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If you can live with a single 120v line, it is easy enough to change 120v to 240v.

I agree that the SS is the only proper choice, but since it is probably out of your budget... I used to have a Grizzly 1023; it was fine, just not a SS.

However, a 1.75hp will be adequate 95% of the time if 240v is a problem.

I also went to a 50" fence when I got a bigger shop and moved up to the SS. It is darned nice to have on a rare occasion, but certainly a poor use of space in a little shop.
 

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On the differences between country of origin........I am only referring to the C.I.(cast iron) here.Once upon a time,in the distant past.Most if not all CI products made in 1st world countries wood be "thrown" out in a back lot of either the foundry or possibly at the factory that was going to use them.

It was believed,and since foundry work balance was tilted a little more twds art than science at that time...........and you can make an impressive argument for that even today.......

CI it seemed,needed to "age" before any serious machine work on it could be truly counted on to hold tolerance.This is what some might call,the good stuff.Meaning,older....aged,tight grained,beautiful,CI.The fact that the USA was on the leading edge of its manufacture.......well,its little wonder there are folks who covet old arn.

If you'd like some interesting reading,check Philadelphia Pa. foundry biz during WWII.The "ole man" I was in biz with(pro cabinet shop)for 10 or so years was the head pattern maker in Philly's largest foundry.It is amazing work.And considering the time period,looking at the metrology...it always makes me laugh when folks start yammerin about WW'ing's lack of precision.The pattern makers can be seen as the inventors of precision.

But back to CI......when the China equipment invasion started back in the 1980's....you could see a noticeable difference in their CI.It was nasty,cheap,inclusion infested junk.And most of it from this time period still is.It wasn't "aged"....heck,it was barely "engineered" to begin with,why bother with any details other than getting the stuff out the door?

Well,for the most part,those early days of CI are gone in Pac rim foundry's.Not saying it dosen't still happen.....but the foundries of the last 10 years or so are a far cry from what was,"then".The US...on the other hand are still struggling with older facilities.It's dirty work.....not really something most folks want their children to grow up doing?

The net effect,here at our shop is in machining and welding CI.There "was" a time whn I could tell just by strinking an arc on a pce of CI as to its origins.New CI,ain't that way anymore.Well,at least CI from the more reputable co.s.......Grizz,Bailiegh,Powermatic,etc.The horror fright equip is still pretty much a joke.Meaning,I'd give prolly a 70-30 bet,against......on its weldability.Where this number "should" be is about 90-10,FOR welding on any finegrain,"good stuff".

Machining CI is nasty.....but hit an "inclusion" in some cheap CI and you'll be creating some new curse words.Start cutting/milling....here....and have the pce,"move"...over there,also isn't any fun.Most shops just don't want to fool with the "good" stuff,not to mention crap CI from China.But,some of the new CI is a little better than even the old US CI......times are changing.Best of luck,BW
 

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in a nutshell

A 120 v circuit uses a black "hot", white "neutral", and a bare or green "ground and has a single pole breaker in the panel.

A 220V circuit uses a black "hot", either a white or red "hot" and a bare or green "neutral" and depending ... may have a separate "ground", and uses a double pole breaker in the panel.

In both cases only 3 conductors are required. As suggested, you do need one more open slot on the panel to add a double pole breaker.

To use the existing wiring, you must have the additional open slot in the panel, change the color of the white wire with tape or marker to indicate it's a "hot" and chose a receptacle consistent with the current capacity of the existing wiring.

I use no. 12 wire which will carry 20 AMPs to run my 3 HP motors, but the motors only draw about 8 AMPs when running, so there is a substantial cushion for "start up" draw which is greater than "run" draw. This is what I do, you are on your own and should consult with a licensed electrician ..... :yes:
 
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I am finally in the market to purchase a decent table saw. I have been using freebies and hand-me-downs my entire life. This will be going in a walk out basement in a shop that is about 14×20. I am leaning towards saws that have a 50” fence. Will this be to much for that size shop?


I began me search looking at high end 110v saws. When I built the house I ran 4 2amp circuits to the basement. I was busy and didn’t consider that I may want some 220 down there. I may have an option of pulling 220 off the back up heat strip 50 amp circuit though. I just need to figure out how I am going do it.
During my 110v saw search I was pretty set on either the Steel City or the Jet Proshop. In all the similiar threads I kept seeing the grizzly 691 and the 1023 coming up. Grizzly is about 2 minutes up the road from my work, so I consider that a huge advantage over the other companies out there. I guess my question is are the 3hp saws from Jet, Delta, General, Powermatic, SawStop (ignoring the safety brake) really worth the almost double the price of the Griz?

IMHO, in a hobbyist's shop, no.

I am looking for a saw that will last me 20 years, if not the rest of my life.

any decent 1.5 hp or greater TS will do that. proper alignment, modulated feed rate and the right sharp blade can go a long way to helping a hobbyists saw perform almost any cut a larger, 3 hp saw will execute. the hobbyist's saw just can't do it all day long or as quickly as a cabinet saw can.

I will not be considering a used saw.
i had an "old arn" unisaw that i refurbed and opted to sell while keeping two 10" emerson built contractor saws. i opted for the mobility of the two contractor saws (herc-u-lifts) and the flexibility two saws provide over one. i have no doubt that my 25 year old son will be using these saws when he's my age.
 

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Do you have an article that you can point me to that explains this?

When I changed mine over to 220 from 110 when I removed the plate that covers the wires that runs the saws motor it had a chart that showed me just what I needed to do. As I recall I also had to change some wires inside the motor also.
 

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Thanks everyone. Sounds like I should have no problem with the electrical requirements of these saws.

Can anyone comment about the fence on the G0690/691 the new 1023 or the Jet deluxe exacta?
i've no first hand experience with jet's fence, but i bet it'll be the most expensive (not necessarily the best) of the one's you're looking at. when i looked at the griz saws in muncy, i wan't too impressed with one of the fences on either the 690 or the 1023 (don't remember which). i was very impressed with the fence that was on the 715 that i saw in their showroom. it was beefy with a very solid head that provided good support for the fence. find out what fence that is and whichever saw (690 or 1023) has it, buy that saw. that fence was really impressive.
 
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