Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

1st post here. I'm a budding woodworker whose made interest in building is audio - speakers. Here is my first & current project:

http://inlowsound.weebly.com/diy-80hz-midbass-horn.html

I have a 10" Dewalt table saw with a 20" rip and 45d bevel. The saw works very well, but the 20" rip max means I have had to use the circ saw for many crosscuts, which of course is much less accurate.

I am having fun with this and have decided to build other things, so I am ready to invest in a Big Boy Saw.

The one can't-give requirement for my next saw is a rip of at least 40".

Perusing HD online, they sell Steel City. They have saws with 50" rip, but there are a couple problems with them:

- Those saws also use 230V, 3 hp motors. I'm going to be cutting ply & hardwood (maple) of at most 1 1/8" thick - I doubt I need a 3 hp motor.

- From what I've read quality control is an issue with these saws.

Should I go for the big Steel City, or something else? As far as budget goes, I'd kinda like to stay under $2K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I wanted to add that a saw that lets me do bevels up to 60d without some crazy jig would be a huge plus also.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Most if not all table saws go to 45 degrees....I have a steel city built table saw and couldn't be happier with it. As for 50 inch rip, you can get extended rails for steel city saws right from them.

In regards to the 3 hp....I do a lot of work in thicker oak...2-3 inches and I wish I had 3 hp....but I get along fine with 1.75.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,987 Posts
Why do you want to rip to 40"? Do you want to crosscut a sheet of plywood?

It is nice to have a 30" capacity, but 40" is overkill and will cost you money that could be better spent otherwise.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why do you want to rip to 40"? Do you want to crosscut a sheet of plywood?

It is nice to have a 30" capacity, but 40" is overkill and will cost you money that could be better spent otherwise.

George
Your advice may be good, actually. 30" is what I really *need* right now. I figured room to spare would be good, but I can't say I'd even need it.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
That sure is a nice saw...and if you were planning on using it 12 hours a day, 6 days a week it might be worth the price, but before you went that route, I'd buy a sawstop saw hands down (no pun intended).


So...my thoughts in recap...

Steel city....great saw....good price....

Powermatic....even better saw...not worth the price

Saw stop.....worth every penny....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just discovered the SawStop saws tonight. $1750 for the 30" contractor model would certainly do it for me.

They really get you with those testimonials! I am very safe with the saw but, of course, it only takes once.
 

·
(clever wood pun here)
Joined
·
979 Posts
I'll play devil's advocate in this conversation, just for fun :yes:.

How much space do you have to dedicate to equipment? If you're going to be working with sheet goods like plywood a lot, building a big out-feed table and an extended wing to the right of the saw are going to be some of the most beneficial upgrades you can do. Even a moderate contractor saw like the Ridgid 4512 would be an excellent choice. You can move the fence rails to the right to extend the rip capacity or just upgrade the fence all together. For about another $150-$200, you can get a superbly accurate Incra (or other make) miter gauge. Depending on how big you make your out-feed table, you can add in another $200 in supplies. Top this all off with a pair of good quality thin-kerf blades (cross cut and a rip cut blade), and you'll be all set. You'd be looking at a grand total in the neighborhood of $1000.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/r4512-fence-wing-upgrades-28490/
This thread shows some custom wings on the r4512.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,737 Posts
You may want a panel saw ?

If I were working with 4 x 8 sheets for speaker cabinets, I'd get a panel or a track saw, which does not require 20 ft of run to rip down the length. Crosscutting is easier also, because you move the saw, not the panel.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/members/woodnthings-7194/albums/panel-saw/
My need for one was so important that I built my own from a RAS motor and carriage.

http://www.widgetworksunlimited.com/Panel_Saw_DIY_Frame_Kit_p/ww-panel_saw-diy.htm
There are plans and kits on the net for DIY panel saws and videos on You Tube.

I also got the SawTrax 78" kit with the ball bearing carriage, but have yet to assemble it since I'm happy with my design. Amazon has a wide variety of saws and kits: http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A228013%2Ck%3Apanel%20saw%20kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
I made the simple straight cutting jig for my circular saw like this one http://youtu.be/CH5dW-QcgeI. I added a good blade and I get perfectly clean and straight cuts on large sheet goods. No need for a 50" rip capacity on my TS, the money saved is better spent elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
Are there any saws at all that can bevel 60d or do you pretty much also have to use some kind of jig/turn the piece vertical for that? It seems the latter. Oh well.

These saws look very nice but certainly aren't cheap:

http://www.powermatic.com/Products.aspx?Part=1791001K&cat=P200
I think you're confusing the miter gauge function and the blade bevel function. Both can produce angle cuts, but from a different approach. The miter gauge pivots to 60° on many gauges....that's an item that can easily be upgraded as an aftermarket purchase (recommended), but the blade itself will likely only tilt to 45° like most others.

The PM is a very expensive, and relatively unproven new saw for a saw with a 1-3/4hp motor and no flesh sensing device. The Grizzly G1023RL offers more saw for less money, and the Saw Stop PCS offers a comparable quality saw with an amazing safety feature for not too much more....both better buys IMHO. Also, Powermatic's parent company will be purchased by Tenex Capital Mgt by October 31, 2013....that may mean nothing to consumers, but it could also mean parts and service disruptions for a while. If you're firm on sticking with 120v power, Steel City, the Steel City made Craftsman 22116, Grizzly G0661/G0715P, Baleigh, Laguna, Jet Proshop, General International, and Shop Fox are also worth some consideration IMO.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,737 Posts
I wanted to add that a saw that lets me do bevels up to 60d without some crazy jig would be a huge plus also.
The miter gauge pivots to 60° on many gauges....that's an item that can easily be upgraded as an aftermarket purchase (recommended), but the blade itself will likely only tilt to 45° like most others.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/need-help-i-need-cut-60-degree-bevel-56006/

Here's a thread about bevels greater than 45 degrees. Woodworking miter gauges, table saws, and miter saws all work with a 90 dgree "zero" setting. So for instance, to make a 60 degree miter or bevel you must use the 30 degree setting on the machine, the complement of 90 degrees. There is no setting for 60 degrees on any miter gauge that I know of.

Another thread: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/angles-setting-miter-saw-9644/

Acute angle are a whole 'nother discussion:

From Toolman1000's post:
For a bevel rip where the workpiece has 22.5 degree bevel the length of it's longest edge (i.e., a rip, not cross, cut):

set blade angle to 67.5 degrees (vertical is 90 degrees. tilt blade 22.5 degrees and remaining bevel angle, between table and blade, is 67.5 degrees)

make sure the saw has a ZCI

attach a sacrificial fence to the saw's fence

use a rip blade (i prefer a 24t blade, 30 would probably do for softwods)

it's kind of like raising a panel on a TS. in the pics below, i'd replace the OEM insert with a ZCI and reverse that panel raising jig sop the short side is on the blade side of the fence. with the work piece held vertically (it's narrow edge on the table of the saw), rip away. a featherboard would be a good idea for keeping the work piece pressed against the sacrificial fence.
Attached Thumbnails
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/need-help-i-need-cut-60-degree-bevel-56006/

Here's a thread about bevels greater than 45 degrees. Woodworking miter gauges, table saws, and miter saws all work with a 90 dgree "zero" setting. So for instance, to make a 60 degree miter or bevel you must use the 30 degree setting on the machine, the complement of 90 degrees. There is no setting for 60 degrees on any miter gauge that I know of.

Another thread: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/angles-setting-miter-saw-9644/

Acute angle are a whole 'nother discussion:

From Toolguy1000's post:
For a bevel rip where the workpiece has 22.5 degree bevel the length of it's longest edge (i.e., a rip, not cross, cut):

set blade angle to 67.5 degrees (vertical is 90 degrees. tilt blade 22.5 degrees and remaining bevel angle, between table and blade, is 67.5 degrees)

make sure the saw has a ZCI

attach a sacrificial fence to the saw's fence

use a rip blade (i prefer a 24t blade, 30 would probably do for softwods)

it's kind of like raising a panel on a TS. in the pics below, i'd replace the OEM insert with a ZCI and reverse that panel raising jig sop the short side is on the blade side of the fence. with the work piece held vertically (it's narrow edge on the table of the saw), rip away. a featherboard would be a good idea for keeping the work piece pressed against the sacrificial fence.
Attached Thumbnails
just curious what the reason for reversing the fence would be if a workpiece were stood on it's edge? wouldn't one want more bearing surface to support and steady the workpiece rather than less surface?
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,737 Posts
heck, I thought that you wrote that...?

just curious what the reason for reversing the fence would be if a workpiece were stood on it's edge? wouldn't one want more bearing surface to support and steady the workpiece rather than less surface?
I wish I could find your original post, but I can't. :blink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
I wish I could find your original post, but I can't. :blink:
How would the original post affect an answer to the question I raised? I don't see how a shorter auxiliary fence would be more advantageous then a tall auxiliary fence when working material on edge. Had I tried to raise the panel in the picture with a short fence, it would have been much more prone to tipping to one side and adversely affecting the operation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
This is subject to much debate but my own personal humble opinion is that SawStop is your answer. Yes, it is pricey. But, as a hand surgeon, let me tell you that so is sewing up a lacerated finger, not to mention what it costs to reattach them or complete the amputation. Then the obvious impairment you are left with. I know not everyone is fortunate enough to be able to fork out that much money, but when you figure the number of saw accidents and what it would save you, financially and body parts, it is a no brainer. To top is all off, it is a great saw and I think the quality is every bit as good as some of the best names out there. I've used them, but to be honest don't know enough personally yet to really evaluate the quality of the cut but everyone who does sings it's praises.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top