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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now I'll admit I didn't plan it out and just threw it together to serve a purpose (stop the baby from going down the stairs ;) ) but now my wife is complaining because it doesn't look "great". The biggest issue is the stopper I had to add. The hinges I got are great and force the gate closed but they overswing the latch so I installed that stopper to stop the gate and force the latch to lock but it's ugly (it painful if you hit it on the way up). Does anyone have another solution for this? What about improvements to the design/construction? All it all it cost ~$20 and once it's painted I think it will look nice so I'm not too worried.
 

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How wide are the gaps between the slats? For safety you want to keep the gaps small, less than 2 3/8" on gates, cribs and cradles. Here's an excerpt from a site. If a child gets an arm or leg hung up in the gate and falls, it could cause some serious injuries.


Risks of Widely-Spaced Slats
Crib slats further apart than 2 3/8 inches leave a gap large enough for a small infant to slip through. If your baby's legs and trunk fall through the slats, he could strangle if his neck and head can't pass through. If he does slip through, he could suffer a skull fracture or other injury from the fall. Falls accounted for 38 percent of the crib injuries suffered by children between the ages of 1 and 5 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, with 65 percent of the crib injuries to 6- to 11-month-olds coming from falls.
 

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Can the latch slide out more overhanging the corner? looks like there's room, but enough? It can act as the stop instead.

If jigs and tools were chairs and stools, we'd always have a place to sit.
~Stumpy Nubs
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How wide are the gaps between the slats? For safety you want to keep the gaps small, less than 2 3/8" on gates, cribs and cradles. Here's an excerpt from a site. If a child gets an arm or leg hung up in the gate and falls, it could cause some serious injuries.


Risks of Widely-Spaced Slats
Crib slats further apart than 2 3/8 inches leave a gap large enough for a small infant to slip through. If your baby's legs and trunk fall through the slats, he could strangle if his neck and head can't pass through. If he does slip through, he could suffer a skull fracture or other injury from the fall. Falls accounted for 38 percent of the crib injuries suffered by children between the ages of 1 and 5 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, with 65 percent of the crib injuries to 6- to 11-month-olds coming from falls.
The gap is 3" and I did this intentionally to allow the cats to travel through it. :smile: Didn't think of the safety issue though, I'll rethink that.

I should take a picture of the entire thing so you can see the hinges. When the door swings back from a full swing too there is a lot of force thus the big stopper. I don't think the latch would stop it too well.
 

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Could ya run a vertical trim board with a cutout for the latch from top of gate to floor. Round off the sharp corners & you should be good to go.
best luck..Jon..
 

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Could you mount a vertical strip on the wall on the hinge side. Position it so the strip prevents the gate from swinging past the latch. Therefore no stop needed on the left/latch side.
 

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I would have it swing open in the opposite direction. First, if it accidentally opened the fall wouldnt be down the stairs. Second, it would latch into the wall. There would be a stud on the gate but it would only be exposed when it is open.
 

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I would have it swing open in the opposite direction. First, if it accidentally opened the fall wouldnt be down the stairs. Second, it would latch into the wall. There would be a stud on the gate but it would only be exposed when it is open.
Great point!
 

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I would have it swing open in the opposite direction. First, if it accidentally opened the fall wouldnt be down the stairs. Second, it would latch into the wall. There would be a stud on the gate but it would only be exposed when it is open.
Came here to say it.

I have 17 month old twins. I've installed 3 baby gates. It's definitely important to swing back from, not over, the stairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Okay, that makes sense. I'll change it to the other side and have it swing away from the stairs. This will put the stopper on the wall side where I can put a big fullsize strip which will look and work better.

As the wife pointed out this makes it hard to hold the gate open so I'm thinking about either a kick-stand or a little latch on the wall which would be kind of ugly.
 

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And please...look at the spacing. There's tons of tragic stories on the web about babies getting stuck between slats of cribs and other similar things....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
And please...look at the spacing. There's tons of tragic stories on the web about babies getting stuck between slats of cribs and other similar things....
Yeah, there seems to be no guideline for gates only cribs.

"If the spacing exceeds 4 inches, it is recommended that the railing be covered with appropriate netting."

"Safety gate slats should be vertical slats or bars less than 3 inches apart to prevent head entrapment. But that could still be enough space to let an adventurous toddler get a foothold on the gate's horizontal bottom rail in an attempt to climb over the gate or go for a ride on the swing-out door. This could lead to injury and could also dislodge and/or damage the gate."
 

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I had to put up a quick and dirty gate to my wife's office to keep the dogs out when the cats need privacy to eat. It's not very decorative, but has been working great for 13 years.

On the hinge side, it's solid wood added to the jamb, to carry the hinges flat. The hinges are the simple screen door types that spring to close.
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gate1.jpg
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On the catch side, an add on "L" to the jamb stops the door. A simple turn latch/catch keeps the gate shut.
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gate2.jpg





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