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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am building a cabinet very similar to the pictures I will link to.
I am trying to determine what type of hinge is being used to let the door pull/tilt out.
I have tried several but have not worked that well.
But I have never been able to find the exact one that cabinets like this use.

http://www.paperstreetantiques.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/IMG_6443.jpg






If no one has any ideas on what type of hinge is being used.
Could you make suggestions on how to achieve the same function that this hinge provides?
Thanks for any help.
 

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If you look closely you will see there is no hinge. That "arm" whose tip is shown in one picture is the mechamism that allows the "drawer" to open and shut.

George
 

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If you could edit your post and resize your picture from 1944 px wide to 800 px wide, it would fit the post better. As it is now it's necessary to scroll right and left.

The "hinge" you see is likely just a control arm to limit the distance the unit comes out. That "tipping" action can be done with ordinary euro hinges on the bottom, and using a lid stay for the "tipping distance". It's a common way I make tip out hamper fronts.









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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I dont think that the euro hinge will work. This is because, like in the picture you can see that the bottom joint between the bottom and front of the shelf actually rotates on the sides of it allowing the bottom corner to swing back inside the unit. With the euro joint, I do not see a good way to sink the joint into the shelf and allow it to fully close. The bottom and front move as one unit. This shelf will be holding vinyl records so the 90 degree angle has to be kept at all times. I hope this is making sense. I dont know how to resize an image in the tags so I just made it a link at the top. Thanks for the suggestions so far.
 

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I dont think that the euro hinge will work. This is because, like in the picture you can see that the bottom joint between the bottom and front of the shelf actually rotates on the sides of it allowing the bottom corner to swing back inside the unit. With the euro joint, I do not see a good way to sink the joint into the shelf and allow it to fully close.
Picture the door/front hinged with a euro hinge to the floor of the cabinet. Then, an "L" shape...has a front and bottom, attaches to the back of the door.. The bottom is a few inches short of the bottom of the cabinet (above the hinges). The door tips out, and closes back in. Works fine for a hamper, will work for a divided record bin.






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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Ok, I see that. However, I also think that a hamper is a little different weight wise. The euro hinge would not allow you to open the door and leave it since the weight of the records would be outside the cabinet causing it to tip forward wouldnt it?
 

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If you want the bottom to slide, you need to provide something for it to slide on. I have no idea if this would work, since I've only spent about two minutes thinking about it, but it might at least provide a starting point.

1) Put drawer slides on the bottom. The kind that mount under the drawer would be best. Rather than fastening them directly to the bin, fasten a block to the slide, and a hinge to the block (or a hinge directly to the slide, if you can figure out how). That lets the drawer tilt and slide.

2) The "hinge" on the side appears to be three parts: a flat plate on the inside wall of the cabinet, and two arms that cross. If you want the same effect, you can probably build something out of steel bar-stock. It would take some fiddling to find the right arm length and placement, but I'm sure you can manage it. Or you can just use a chain at each side to control how far the thing can lower: that sounds easier to me, and if you added in a pulley and some counterweights it might make the bins easier to close.
 

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Ok, I see that. However, I also think that a hamper is a little different weight wise. The euro hinge would not allow you to open the door and leave it since the weight of the records would be outside the cabinet causing it to tip forward wouldnt it?
Actually, it's the opposite. The load is on the back of the door behind the pivoting of the hinge. The door has a load to open and when rotated outward far enough to get the weight past the vertical line of the hinge the weight transfers outward. Until that point, the door will have the weight to make it want to close.

To keep the door open past the line of the hinge takes a restraint stay, while trying to keep it open when it wants to close doesn't really allow enough opening clearance to have a good access if you need it slightly open.






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I'd look in two places.
1. Lee Valley. I got a complete set of 1923 icebox hardware which was a perfect match for my icebox which had some ugly mods over the years. Oak. $29.95. The original price tag is still in it!
2. Home Depot. They have some sort of a deal with a cabinet hardware outfit who make and/or supply the weirdest gizmos which I would not even guess how to install. Almost none of it is in the store, but there should be their catalog floating around in that part of the store.
 

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I'm not really sure what the problem is. I've seen the same sort of action using trunnions, one on each side. The forward tilt is stopped by the trunnion being stopped on the "back" end.

It stays open because the weight is forward of the "hinge point" (the putative "center" of the trunnion) when fully open.

It stays closed because the weight is behind the "hinge point" whe the "drawer" is closed...

Preferably these conditions are met when the "drawer" is empty, although the first one I made (sort-of - it didn't work too well, but then I was only 11 years old) needed to have something in the drawer to stay in the desired position... :oops:


Annoying.

Also embarrassing.:icon_redface:

Some 60 years ago now it was a pluperfect BITCH cutting the trunnions. Today... with a router... and a circle/arc cutting jig... a lead pipe cinch.

Good luck. Have fun.
 

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Did you ever find a supplier for these dual acting hinges?
Somehow the link got switched. No sunglasses.:laughing:






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I've only seen one and I never new the name for it. The hinge is shaped like a triangle with the pivot on one corner. Most furniture I've seen made like that just used a hardwood dowel to pivot on like the one shown in the picture.
 

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What I see with the linkage arm in the pics could be a variation on the lever lid in this video. Just turn the process upside down to lift the bottom of the "drawer" as you open, then it pivots inside to balance better and not tip the cabinet over.

Mike "Dodis"

 
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