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My wife and I built a table for our kitchen using a design that uses 2 x 6's across the table top. As better woodworkers would have realized, these 2 x 6s have rounded edges, leaving shallow little ditches between the planks. Our 2-year-old would have filled those ditches with mashed peas, we preempted her by filling them with Elmer's stainable wood putty, leaving a smooth perfectly flat top. :yes:

Unfortunately, the putty makes it looks like we've just cemented the boards together. Between each beautiful slat of redwood there's an uneven line of cement-grey putty. I tried staining it, but it didn't take very well. So I tried wood matching markers and wood matching pencils tonight. Again no luck. Home Depot tried some water based paints on it, but the grey putty was still visible.:thumbdown:

Plan is to polyurethane it when the color matches.

What should we do? Help me save my table, please!
 

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Nah. Give it up. Save the kid from being inhibited by a table top.
Do every kind of craft and artwork and messy foodie things that you can.
You can and will be the envy of the nieghborhood. Invite their kids over.

I had neighbors who would not allow their kids to paint or draw because it was "too messy."
Held back in school because their hand/eye coordination was so poor.
Anything t5hat they ever did was in my kitchen.
Yeah, yeah, so it go redecorated when they were 12.

The next time you take a deep breath, they're gone. As in "away gone away."
Sorry. Some nights, I can't shake off the empty nest thing.
 

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Old School
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Here's what I would do. First set up a straight edge longer that the top, and clamp to the table so a router bit will pass dead center between the boards. The router base will ride against the edge of the straightedge.

I would set up in a router a straight faced router bit (mortising), wide enough to put a square edge on both pieces in one pass, and to a depth of ¼". It may be ¼" wide or 3/8" wide, but enough to make a nice squared out groove.

Then rip strips of the wood used for the top, the right width to fit, and a bit taller than the groove depth...like 5/16", and glue in those strips. When dry, block sand flat. You will have nice clean seams.









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What Cman said, that'll work perfectly. But...I have to go with Robson Valley's suggestion. They're gone oh so soon. When the kids leave, then build you and Mama a nice table....and let the grand kids do whatever they want on it. LOL
 

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Lector
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Nah. Give it up. Save the kid from being inhibited by a table top.
Do every kind of craft and artwork and messy foodie things that you can.
You can and will be the envy of the nieghborhood. Invite their kids over.

I had neighbors who would not allow their kids to paint or draw because it was "too messy."
Held back in school because their hand/eye coordination was so poor.
Anything t5hat they ever did was in my kitchen.
Yeah, yeah, so it go redecorated when they were 12.

The next time you take a deep breath, they're gone. As in "away gone away."
Sorry. Some nights, I can't shake off the empty nest thing.
Remember, you are not an empty Nester till all their stuff is out of the basement.
 

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where's my table saw?
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remake the top?

If you don't have a router to clean out the gaps/V's, the only way I can see to fix it is to pull off the boards, rip the edges and add one new board to make up the difference.
There is router or dado plane that you can use by hand, if you want to do that. There is also a small dado set for a circular saw ... I got some on Ebay a while back. You would need a straight edge guide for that just like the router.

You can set in a contrasting narrow strip of pine or Cedar to fill in the gap.

You can get all the ugly putty out by what ever means and the pour a bartop finish on the entire top filling the gaps.

You can put a glass top over the whole thing....
 

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If you have a place near you that has a wide planer, take the top to them and get it planed down until the top is smooth. Then sand and refinish.
 

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another note to cabinet mans comments, I saw at wood craft they sell nice inlay patterns in strips, you can also order them online. Could make a nice touch to the table depending on your tastes.
 

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Old School
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another note to cabinet mans comments, I saw at wood craft they sell nice inlay patterns in strips, you can also order them online. Could make a nice touch to the table depending on your tastes.
I thought about mentioning them. The problem I see is that when the two boards are butted and the small radiused edges are touching, a groove wide enough to square off the radius, would leave a void under the center line, which would be unsupportive to a veneer inlay. Those inlays are pretty thin.

A dado just deep enough to allow a veneer to sit high enough to be sanded flat, would have a deep "v" below it from where the two radii meet where butted. My thoughts would be to dado a groove wide and deep enough to accept a solid wood inlay.






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