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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have inherited an old moghany table. I was told it is a "Duncan Phyfe" but im not sure. I would like to refinish it. The veneer on he top has a couple of "flaky" edges and is chipping off there is also a big burn spot. I was told my grandma put down a hot pot and scaled the table. What can I do to repair and refinish this table ?
 

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I have inherited an old moghany table. I was told it is a "Duncan Phyfe" but im not sure. I would like to refinish it. The veneer on he top has a couple of "flaky" edges and is chipping off there is also a big burn spot. I was told my grandma put down a hot pot and scaled the table. What can I do to repair and refinish this table ?
If the veneer is just loose you can work some glue under the veneer and clamp it. I use a artist spatula to work glue under veneer. It's a good idea to reglue the veneer before stripping it as the stripping process can make the veneer wrinkle up. If you have places flaked off you might consider re-veneering it. Usually filling a place on a table top looks pretty unsightly. The burn sometimes is mostly the finish. When stripped most of it comes off. Without seeing a picture I couldn't guess what degree the damage is. Also sometimes the veneer is thick enough you can sand it out. In any case the if the burn is really bad the only solution is to re-veneer it so you might as well try to sand it out. Another option normally a Duncan Phyfe table top is made from lumber core plywood. It might be easier to get a sheet of lumber core plywood and make a new top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
christilaila said:
I have inherited an old moghany table. I was told it is a "Duncan Phyfe" but im not sure. I would like to refinish it. The veneer on he top has a couple of "flaky" edges and is chipping off there is also a big burn spot. I was told my grandma put down a hot pot and scaled the table. What can I do to repair and refinish this table ?
Wood Hardwood Floor Wood stain Laminate flooring


I hope this picture helps.
 

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Sorry, I am very new to this forum and refinishing furniture. I have no idea what I'm doing. I love his table and it has sentimental value to me. My hubby wants new stuff so I'm trying to repair it and bring it back to life on a budget.
 

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Before you strip it wipe the table down with mineral spirits. I can't tell from the picture if the stain has been sanded into on that spot. If the color is uniform you might be able to recoat the table instead of completely stripping it. When you strip a table it takes out the grain filler with the finish. The surfaces scratches as well as a spot that has been sanded with melt away if you would recoat it with lacquer. The color of the table wet with mineral spirits would give you an idea of what it would look like recoated with the exception of the white around where you have been sanding on it. It would take lacquer thinner to melt the white away but if you use lacquer thinner spray it. Rubbing it would take the finish off.

If you choose to refinish it I would glue any loose veneer down first and then strip it with a methylene chloride stripper, soon, it's getting close to winter and strippers don't do well below 70 degrees. After stripping sand the table top starting with 180 grit paper and finish with 220 grit. Then use a grain filler. The oil based mahogany grain filler that Mohawk Finishing Products sells is about the perfect color to stain the table. It is usually all that is needed. Fill the grain according to the directions and let dry overnight. Then sand the residue off with 220 grit sandpaper and finish. The old finish on the table is a nitrocellulose lacquer but there is no reason you can't use any finish. If you have the means of spraying I would probably seal the table with a vinyl sealer and topcoat with a pre-catalyzed lacquer. A table top like that almost has to be sprayed regardless of the finish you use. You could do it by hand but the hand rubbing labor would drive you nuts.
 
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