Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

Like most of the newbies, I've just invested some $$ in used tools, table saw w/ router, planer, jointer, and am more than a little excited to get building. Since I am in New England and have a garage shop, I am learning, the hard way, how large an affect the darn weather changes have on my lumber. I am now going to begin storing everything in the basement, but any and all advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a ton for all the great info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Hello all,

Like most of the newbies, I've just invested some $$ in used tools, table saw w/ router, planer, jointer, and am more than a little excited to get building. Since I am in New England and have a garage shop, I am learning, the hard way, how large an affect the darn weather changes have on my lumber. I am now going to begin storing everything in the basement, but any and all advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a ton for all the great info.
Welcome to the forum. You'll find a lot of great advice and help here.

I live just outside of Chicago and the winter weather plays havoc here as well. We probabaly don't have the humidity issues you all do but the cold is just brutal (30 below zero this winter). The temperature won't really affect too much but the moisture content of the wood sure will. That's what you need to watch carefully.....

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,031 Posts
TimBrennan,
Welcome to the forum. Sounds like tomorrow should be a holiday for you.:smile: I never see Norm complain of the weather at the yankee workshop. Storing your wood inside will help, but when you take it back out to the shop, you may still run into problems if the humidity level is quite a bit higher. Is your shop insulated, and if so, how do you heat it in the wintertime?
Mike Hawkins;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Sadly my garage is not insulated. It is a 2-car (but has never had 1 in it), detatched guy with lots of rafters. I've only been working in it for about a month and borrowed a neighbors patio heater (propane) to warm the air up a bit. It wouldn't do a darn thing for the cast iron, though. I have bulkhead doors down to the basement so storing and moving boards in and out of there should prove to be less of a hassle than it sounds.

As for Norm. He has magical wood that springs flat and square at the snap of his fingers.

Learned a bit last night re: jointer vs planer. I originally wanted to glue 2-8" boards as sides for a box. But after planing and planing the 3/4" board down to 1/2", the bow was still in it. Hint- flipping doesn't work. Don't listen to someone who says it does. Last night I used my 6" jointer to flatten and square a 6" board before heading to the planer. Amazingly, that did the trick. Don't you hate when those who have been there before are right? I'll check/sand the glue-up tonight. Wish me luck!

1 question: I'm using a 10" 50 tooth craftsman combo blade that came with the saw. When I cross-cut, the blade wanders a bit, making the surface wavy. Will the craftsman finishing blade be better or is do I need to invest in a Forrest, Freud, etc.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,031 Posts
Tim,
I have recently been replacing my current blades with forrest blades, one at a time. They seem to work very well, and if you still have problems, you can't blame it on the blade. That propane heater throws off a lot of moisture, probably not helping your situation in the shop. Might want to check into another heat source for next winter, and add some insulation if you can. Makes a world of difference. Anyway, it's St. Patty's day, and my middle name is Patrick, and I do have a little bit of Irish in my ancestry, so I have to get back to my Great Lakes Brewing Company Christmas Ale.(Local Cleveland microbrew beer, good stuff...)
Mike Hawkins:drink:
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top