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I wood if I could.
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thats a good job Steve, you can make a movie with those fellows :)
I thought about how cool it would be to use them in some stop motion animation.

While I don't plan on doing that, I do intend to make a few humorous accessories for mine, my wife's and son's. And maybe have a few available for the ones I try to sell.
 

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I wood if I could.
Joined
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3,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Uh, do you guys have any "tree-free" rump ribbon up in here?

Wood Robot Toy Sculpture Machine


Hi, Ya'll!

Animation Art Robot


Ready, set, go.

Toy Figurine Robot Joint Animation


Teeth are chattering.

Art Figurine Toy Games Robot


Flashdance!

Toy Joint Figurine Animation Wood
 

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I wood if I could.
Joined
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3,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Thanks for looking in and posting comments, guys. I thought you might enjoy these. I love making things that are different from the more common, expected types of projects.

Here's the book I got the pattern from: Zany Wooden Toys That Whiz, Spin, Pop, and Fly: Bob Gilsdorf: 9781565233942: Amazon.com: Books

There are some really novel and clever projects in there. Mind you, I did design my own torso (using the same overall dimensions) and cosmetics. I also re-dimensioned the ball joints. Fortunately, I had enough sense to make a test ball joint - using the exact dimensions in the plans - to troubleshoot any possible problems before committing to the design. As that was a hell of a lot of parts to risk cutting and drilling them all then having to scrap 'em and start over. And I found that the called-for dimensions DON'T quite work right. Yes, I used the correct size of ball called for in the plans. The hole was way too large and the centering of the slot was off. So I went with a smaller hole and opening, which I centered for more balanced appearance. The dimensions in the plans would leave you unable to tighten the joint without major inside sanding, which would have thrown off the appearance even worse.

I also used shorter dowels on the joints than called for in the plans. Well, I started with the length called for then found that I had to trim every single one of them. I did come up with a very quick, simple way to trim them all to the same length after the balls were already glued on. So I learned a cool trick while I was at it that might also come in handy in the future. The length they labeled on the drawings would have made the joints too long and weird-looking. The way I did the eyes was my idea too. When I first saw the ball joint robot project in the book I knew I wanted to make one and I'm so glad I did. Despite the minor dimension issues in the plans, I had a blast making these. And building 16 at once only upped the fun factor.

My advice to all: buy the book and make yourself one of these articulated ball joint robots. You won't be disappointed. If I didn't make these under such a time crunch I would have made at least one of them from walnut and exotics. But I don't know that I feel like making any more of these any time soon. Maybe some day. If they sell well, however, I'll be all for making another batch. :thumbsup:
 

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I wood if I could.
Joined
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3,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Explaination of how I drilled the balls.

I was asked (by a member of the woodworking club I'm in) to explain how I went about drilling all of the 3/4" wooden balls. I figured I should post it here as well in case any one wonders.

Damn near every one of these balls had to be drilled with a 1/4" for the robot project.

Food Vegetable Chickpea Navy beans Bean


I put down a piece of scrap board on my drill press table. See the hole highlighted black? That's what the ball sat on.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Pink Table


Another, smaller, piece of scrap was then drilled with a stepped drill bit to form a tapered hole that was 3/4" at the widest.

Leather Material property Hand Wood Finger


I then pressed a ball into the tapered hole (finger tight).

Table Wood


Finally, I held the holding block ball-side-down onto the hole in the wood on the drill press table and set up a fence (for quick indexing), which I clamped in place. Now all I had to do was press down on the holder block (about 3/16" gap exists between the sacrificial board and the holder block) tight enough to prevent the ball from spinning and drill the hole.

Wood Hardwood Finger Table Hand


I used a bamboo chopstick (a dowel would work fine) to pop the drilled ball out of the tapered hole. Insert the next one and continue on. Almost perfect holes every time.
 

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I wood if I could.
Joined
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3,976 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I failed to mention that a brad point bit should be used. And, of course, the hole in the sacrificial table should be centered with respect to the drill bit/chuck. So drill it first. Then change to the bit you need to drill into the ball WITHOUT moving the table.
 
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