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Eventually I'd like to make the entire set pictured above for myself. I'd like to start with the headboard and then move on to the frame and night tables.

I have little to no experience woodworking and access to a fair amount of woodworking tools. I'd rather take my time, learn the proper skills and do this project right then just go for it and do a lousy job sooner.

Right now I've got a few questions about the headboard.

1. What's your suggestion on the best way to put it together? (one piece of wood that's routed, several pieces put together, etc?)

2. What kind of tools do you think will be absolutely essential to the assembly method you've suggested?

3. What type of wood would you suggest? (maple, pine etc but also ply board or solid piece)

I apologize if my questions seem ignorant, that's just kind of where I'm at with woodworking right now. I suppose I need to start somewhere though. Maybe a fourth question would be:

4. Are there any other projects you would suggest I tackle first to better prepare myself for this one?

and:

5. Any other tips or pieces of advice on how I should proceed with this project or my journey into woodworking in general?


Thanks very much for your time
 

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Kudos for thinking big! I would suggest that before you tackle a job of this size that you might want to brush up on the basics. Are you able to cut to a line with a hand saw or circular saw? Are you able to mark and measure accurately? This may sound rudimentary, but unless you are able to perform these basics, you will not be able to accomplish any project.

Not assuming this, I would measure the headboard or get the specs, because just looking at it, to me it appears to be over 8' long so two sheets of plywood stacked on top of each other with lines routed out will not work unless you have access to a specialty supplier that has longer panels. If you don't mind not reproducing 100% then this is the method I would use. The panels could be mated and braced from behind with some 1x3 or even 2x4 or at each corner behind the panels so that they are not in view with a wooden post.

The end tables look like they are just simple U shaped tables, nothing more than butt joints could get it done.

The bed seems to be a simple low platform bed, 4 short chunky posts with dado's across one or two faces to allow rails to pass horizontally, the rails in my opinion could be 2x6 or similar width with a rabbet on the top edge to capture the large platform that will sit on top, which can be nothing more than plywood panels. These of course will have to be supported by a grid of stringers that attach to the left and right rail if you view the piece head on.

As for wood, use what you have access to. I say this because ultimately if you have little or no experience, your best solution would be to paint the piece. Of course you could save yourself some time and make the whole thing out of Gaboon Ebony :eek::laughing: just kidding.

A router and circular saw with associated straight line guides would be necessary.

As for advice, read as much as you can. Tackle smaller projects that will teach you the basics first. Go to a woodworking class if you can.
Enjoy ;-)
 

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where's my table saw?
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agree with the approach to basics

You can think of the project being made from separate modules that get joined together. The frame would have at least 4 separate pieces, the headboard might have 4 pieces as well depending on the height and length, and the night stands would be separate and attached or sitting on top of the frame. It's a cool contemporary design in my opinion and I like the black finish.

Working drawings with dimension will be necessary for one. :smile:

A draftsmans' T square and some white butcher paper OR some cheap 1/4" plywood with a smooth surface.

Your "access" to other tools needs to be specified ....which tools?
How much working space is available for this big project. Final assembly can be at the site but a dry fit prior would be best.
 
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