Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm growing in skills as a woodworker but have run up against the limits on my table saw.

I have the Bosch 4100 contractor's saw which is rated as one of the better contractor's table saws, and it is a fine piece of machinery, however the table top is small and the precision is just less than what I would like.

Since I'm up against having a small shop I really can't get one of those juicy cabinet saws which appears like they need an acre of room. Plus my table saw has to be shuffled around a bit in the shop to make room for using other machines.

Do they make a precision cabinet saw in which the table extensions can be removed and conveniently put back on when needed? Knowing the demand for table extensions being perfectly planer to the saw table what I'm asking might not have been invented yet.

I can afford a good saw but I can't afford to replace my house with a bigger garage/shop. lol Any suggestions?
 

·
Dumbest Smart Person
Joined
·
434 Posts
When you say "the precision is just less than what I would like" what exactly is out of your specification?

Consider a track saw. They're kinda like a circular saw, but supposedly offer better accuracy and reduced tearout. I think the Festool TS-55 is one of the preferred models, if I'm not mistaken.

I just ordered some aluminum extrusion for a project and the manufacturer supplied a little booklet with some pictures of various projects people had submitted. There's no plans here, but it's an interesting idea.

You could also get one of those old contractor style table saws on craigslist with crappy stamped steel wings and build your own folding wings out of wood.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,302 Posts
upgrade from the Bosch 4100?

I have the Bosch 4100 and it's a fine saw for on site jobs and I could "make do", if it were my only saw.... however I also have a 10" Hybrid Craftsman 1.75 HP cast iron with a Biesemeyer fence, no longer in production. :no: :thumbdown: Luckily, Steel City Tools makes a similar model and that's what I would recommend. http://steelcitytoolworks.com/products_tools.cfm?section=2&category=12&tool=35950

It's not a 3 HP cabinet saw requiring 220 V, but weighs in at 330 lbs so it's very similar to my Craftsman which is a very solid and accurate saw. :thumbsup: Aluminum top saws like the Bosch, just don't inspire confidence for accuracy and precision. The 1.75 Hp won't be an issue for a home shop using a thin kerf blade for ripping like the Freud D1024X. All other cuts in sheet goods and hardwood will be easy.

The used Hybrid market would be another place to look if the new saw prices are too much for the budget. Folding side extensions would be difficult to maintain accuracy. JMO. So get used to the larger foot print and you will be a much happier woodworker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Quick adding and removal of table extensions is a tough nut to crack, and a bigger problem is the fence rails. Professional-grade fences are your way to precision, but they don't easily extend or shorten.

A few of the hybrid saws come with built-in wheels to permit moving/storing them when not in use. I'd look at the Steel City models in your price range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,445 Posts
What you have is a "portable jobsite saw". There is a slightly undersized portable "contractor saw" from General International. Grizzly offers the similar G0732, but it's mounted to a stationary leg stand....it could be transferred to a portable stand also.

50-090K:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When you say "the precision is just less than what I would like" what exactly is out of your specification?

Consider a track saw. They're kinda like a circular saw, but supposedly offer better accuracy and reduced tearout. I think the Festool TS-55 is one of the preferred models, if I'm not mistaken.

I just ordered some aluminum extrusion for a project and the manufacturer supplied a little booklet with some pictures of various projects people had submitted. There's no plans here, but it's an interesting idea.

You could also get one of those old contractor style table saws on craigslist with crappy stamped steel wings and build your own folding wings out of wood.

My current saw is all aligned properly. The other day I was trying to get a precise cut on a piece of plywood and just opening and closing the fence lock stood a fifty-fifty chance of going over or under what I was trying to shoot for. A tad frustrating. A micro-adjustment would have been super cool.

Plus I only have about nine inches or so of table before you engage the blade which makes a nice 24" deep cross cut sled a balancing act until you get your piece up to the blade. I also own a really nice track saw system but it's a hassle dragging it out. Also, some of the after market inserts and such are disappointing with the Bosch.

I was wondering if there existed a nice cabinet saw that you could conveniently add the table extensions, on all sides, just when they're needed. I suppose the fence is what gets screwed up with that kind of concept.
 

·
Dumbest Smart Person
Joined
·
434 Posts
On my contractor saw, it only takes about 15 minutes tops to take off or put on the wings, fence rails, and outfeed table. There's 4 bolts on each wing plus 3 on each side for the outfeed table, and a few more on the fences. It's not ideal, but if I had to move the thing around in a garage all the time it would be possible. With all the rails and wings off, the foot print isn't too much. 20" x 38" I think.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,302 Posts
store it vertically

like this:



A movers dolly will allow you to roll it around with the rails vertically and save space. OR a simple plywood base the right height would work for the stand on locking casters, with a hinge on one side of the saw base similar to the stand above. The rails are what take up the floor space on the saws with good ripping capacity to the right of the blade. I suppose you could stand a cabinet type saw on the left side if need be by strategically placing a dolly on the floor to support it so the weight is not on the rails or side extensions.

My solution for my contractor saw was to make a plywood table that caps over the saw table and I used it for a work table when in that mode. When I needed the saw, I just cleared off the stuff and removed the plywood...ready to go. The saw itself was on 2 large wagon wheels and rested on the floor on the opposite side. I moved it around "wheelbarrow" fashion.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top