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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the planning stage of my new project and I am wanting to build 2 audio/video cabinets to match my entertainment center.

I have rounded corner pieces that I have not yet figured out how to make. I have searched this forum & the interweb and have not found anything similar. I have called a couple wood/funiture shops and ran into dead ends.

I have pictures below of my entertainment center showing the corners. They are made out of one solid piece of red oak.
The dimensions are 18' long with a 2 1/2" outside radius and 1 /1/2" inside radius. I am trying to find someone who can make them for me. Or I will make them myself IF I could just find a Red oak log.
The idea I came up with is to drill a 3" Hole through a 20" log. Then since I do not have a lathe, I would use my router and turn the outside diameter to 5". Then use my table saw and cut the corner piece.

What do you guys suggest I do? Any help at all would be welcome.

The furniture piece in the middle is what I want to build matching end bookcase/cabinet's for housing audio & video equipment.









Here is the design drawings of what I am making. The center piece is my entertainment center and the 2 end pieces is what I need to build.





 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
That may work for me. but what about the exposed ends? can I veneer over them too or will the woodgrain clash?

I have talked with professional custom funiture builders and they all wanted to glue together thin strips to form a radius, none mentioned this idea, might be because I need a 2 1/2" radius.
 

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I suppose you could make that if you drilled out the center of of a larger dowel or similar round stock, and then split it into quarters with a bandsaw.

My guess is that those pieces are faked and were not cut from tube-stock wood, but a round-top router bit was used to clean out the middle.
 

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Old School
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That may work for me. but what about the exposed ends? can I veneer over them too or will the woodgrain clash?

I have talked with professional custom funiture builders and they all wanted to glue together thin strips to form a radius, none mentioned this idea, might be because I need a 2 1/2" radius.
If you just can't use 3" radius, you could kerf cut the back of ¾" plywood.




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It's not too hard to make. It is a little labor intensive, but not too bad. Listed below is a simplified step process. If you don't know how to cove cut for example, I'm sure there is a video on youtube...

1. Trace or construct a pattern. I would construct by holding a straight edge vertically against the cabinet side with the end extended slightly above the top of the cabinet. Measure from the straight edge horizontally over to the glue joint where the top meets the solid radiused molding. That will be your outer radius. To find the inner radius subtract 3/4", or thickness of the side panel. Now draw the 2 concentric circles, then quarter them by drawing a vertical and horizontal line through the center point, or just use graph paper. Cut out your 4 patterns.

2. Use the pattern to determine the width and thickness of the stock to be used. Glue 1 pattern to each end of the dimensioned stock.

3. Use a tall fence on the table saw, or band saw and remove the excess wood by making angled cuts on the convex side.

4. Use a hand plane, belt or random orbit sanders to refine the shape.

5. Using the table saw place the flat face down, and rip each long edge to 45 degrees.

6. Finish by cutting a cove on the flat face using the table saw. (You'll want to practice and set your fence/jig angle, blade size, tilt ... on softwood scrap. You'll want to turn the board end for end each time to keep the cove centered. Take only about a 1/16" on each pass. Just nibble away until you get as close as you can and finish with a gooseneck scraper and a formed sanding block. If you watch a video and have questions about cutting different widths for your predetermined depth, ask for help.)

*Making templates from 1/4" ply, or hardboard may help you keep the concave and convex curves may help with consistency. (I've never used them) A final suggestion is to use a stock length just a little over twice the length of each piece. IOW if you need 2 18" pieces, use a 37" long board, which is a nice size to handle BTW. (Cut your 2 18" pieces from the longer board.)
 

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where's my table saw?
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a router jig can make the outside cylinder

Like this:

The inside radius can be made before the cylinder is turned with a cove bit. The best way is to glue 4 separate pieces separated by kraft paper which will allow it it be split apart cleanly and easily.

It may be possible to just make a radius part way into the cylinder using a hole saw and leave the rest as a right angle gluing surface...I donno? depends on the corner construction and design.

Another method would be to use 1 long length 80" in your case, and rout out the center radius. Then cut the piece into 4 lengths and glue them together and then round over the outside radius.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey thanks for all the help guys, I need it. Right now I'm in the middle of working 12 hour days so I won't have time off until Monday. Then I can study your suggestions fully.

I know all I need is some shelves to hold my A/V gear, but I would not be happy with that. Even though I don't have the time to build matching cabinets, it is what I want. and I am determined to get them made or built. I will find the time and resources. A little help from good people goes a long way and it means a lot to me. so thanks.
 

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That's a pretty easy cut with a decent shaper.....which is what my money is on regarding how the factory managed it.

But what fun would that be?You have some choices posted above,it's up to you to come up with what best serves your shop's arsenal of equip and maybe more importantly,your skillsets.

Try and keep a record(notes are a very under-utilized expedient in sm shops BTW)of your strategies.It will be interesting to look back on them once you get an approach or technique developed.

My input would be,watch your tooling/finishing for tracks/scratches that may show up when in the finish room.And this isn't "limited" to scratch/sander/grinder marks.One of the biggy's in radius work is how well you hit tangents......really need to buckle down on this aspect.Best of luck,check back in,be safe.
 
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