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My wife and I bought a brand new house in 2007 that has veneer hardwood floors in the kitchen.

I noticed this morning that our kitchen has 1000s of high heel divots all over it. It looks like complete garbage now especially that we have very dark glossy floors. (When I say 1000s I mean at least 2 in every square inch in an area of about 400 square feet)

I'm trying not to get mad at her but I absolutely loved this house and everything about it and this just ruins it for me. This is by far the worse thing we've done to our home so far, and I can't imagine much worse really. (This paragraph is just here for some venting, this only happened a few hours ago and I am still pretty tore up about it, sorry)

I've done some reseach this morning and it looks like our only possible solution is maybe refinishing, but I have no experience with woodworking so I have a few questions please:

1. Are there any other solutions besides sanding and refinishing? (The floors are not even two years old yet)

2. Is it possible to refinish a veneer hardwood floor?

3. Would it ever go back to the way it looked before?

4. Is it possible to only sand the areas that are dented or do all the floors need to be done at the same time?

5. Is it very expensive to have it refinished?

Thanks for reading this guys. I miss apartment living!
 

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Old School
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WELCOME TO THE FORUM

Depending on how thick the veneer is, sanding will only take the high spots down (not the divots). Not much can be done about the indentations. In any case, use of high heels can damage wood floors. A solid wood floor could be refinished.

I would replace with a porcelain or ceramic tile.






 

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What he said

Engineered (veneered) flooring has a relatively thin wear layer of hardwood on top. (Just think of oak plywood, but laid on the floor.) Different manufacturers use varying thicknesses of this layer. If you can get a view of the flooring from an end, so you can see the plies, you will know how much you can sand off of the top. If you sand only the divots, the floor will look wavy. The depth of the divots will depend on the size of the heels, and the weight load, (I'm not gonna' touch that one). If I were you, I'd pick the least conspicuous spot and hit it with a palm sander. CH
 

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The builder gave us a spec book that probably tells us what type of veneer hardwood we have. I will look in it when I get home to see if I can find out how thick the wood layer is.

Regarding the dents, there's not much weight on the heels but the dang heels are so pointy. The dents are no where near as deep as when you drop a can of peas on the floor but they are very very abundadnt, almost like she was doing laps around the house in them!
 

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You might try to raise the divots rather than sanding down the area around them. Try dampening a few divots and laying a damp towel over them and applying a warm iron. (setting somewhat lower than "Cotton".)
Trial and error as to how long to leave the iron on the towel.
I've done this on solid wood and some plywoods. Sometimes it works well and other times, not so well. But, it's worth a try.
 

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I built a new house and it sickened me to see my wife and my kids damage it. I just made a decision to wait till the kids were grown and gone to fix their damage in one remodel project. I made a decision to wait till the wife was also gone to fix her damage. She got a cat once and the cat pissed on the basement carpet. I said to her . . . "Why don't you get rid of that cat?". She said, "I'd rather get rid of you.".

I realized this wasn't my house.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You might try to raise the divots rather than sanding down the area around them. Try dampening a few divots and laying a damp towel over them and applying a warm iron. (setting somewhat lower than "Cotton".)
Trial and error as to how long to leave the iron on the towel.
I've done this on solid wood and some plywoods. Sometimes it works well and other times, not so well. But, it's worth a try.
Do you think it will work on veneer hardwood? (I'm not sure what plywood is, is it the same as veneer hardwood?)
 

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where's my table saw?
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2 choices....

You can fix the floor either by a self leveling epoxy like for bar tops
since you can't sand out the dents because of the thin veneer on the hardwood.....or you can enjoy the sight of your wife dancin' laps in her high heels and forget the damn dents.... You gettin' the picture here?:laughing: bill

Quote:
Regarding the dents, there's not much weight on the heels but the dang heels are so pointy. The dents are no where near as deep as when you drop a can of peas on the floor but they are very very abundadnt, almost like she was doing laps around the house in them![/quote]
 

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Old School
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You can fix the floor either by a self leveling epoxy like for bar tops
since you can't sand out the dents because of the thin veneer on the hardwood.....or you can enjoy the sight of your wife dancin' laps in her high heels and forget the damn dents.... You gettin' the picture here?:laughing: bill

That epoxy is not suitable for a floor finish. If those are his only choices, he should get used to the dents.






 

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Do you think it will work on veneer hardwood? (I'm not sure what plywood is, is it the same as veneer hardwood?)
No, I don't think it's the same. I suggest you try it on an inconspicuous spot. If it's actual hardwood veneer, as opposed to hardboard with an applied grain, it should work fine.Not too wet, just dampen the divot and apply the barely damp towel and heat.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Old School
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You can fix the floor either by a self leveling epoxy like for bar tops

Bar top epoxy is what I was referring to being not suitable.


This clear epoxy is for floors. I know nothing else about it, but a call to the company may be worth it. 10 yr warranty is more than others and it is self leveling after rolling.
http://www.superfloorcoat.com/mono-coat-TS-200-clear.asp
:thumbsup: bill

This type of coating (the two types that could be used on wood floors), when called "self leveling" doesn't mean you can pour it on and it will fill the dents and "self level". It is applied like any floor coating. The "self leveling" means roller or brush marks will likely not show.






 

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Sam,
When I was building houses in the 90's, we put in a fair amount of 3/4" hardwood flooring. I always talked to the homeowners ahead of time, especially the wife, to clue them in about spike heels. When you figure out how many pounds per square inch are on those little points, it is way heavier than a refridgerator. The general rule is the spike heels have to stay off the floor, period.;)
Mike Hawkins
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sam,
When I was building houses in the 90's, we put in a fair amount of 3/4" hardwood flooring. I always talked to the homeowners ahead of time, especially the wife, to clue them in about spike heels. When you figure out how many pounds per square inch are on those little points, it is way heavier than a refridgerator. The general rule is the spike heels have to stay off the floor, period.;)
Mike Hawkins
Yeah Mike, that was one of the first rules we came up with when we first bought this house, then I think she noticed that her shoes are not leaving marks so she started wearing them in the house, but since she gets a new pair every couple of weeks or so, I think she finally came across one that did the job :D

We went back to absolutely no high heels in the house, and we're putting a runner around the high traffic area.

I went back and looked at it again last night, it's in a pretty limited area (About 25 square feet). Just the path from the kitchen sink, to the stove to the fridge. From where she gets dressed in the morning and then fixes breakfast. Heh, the more I think about it the less I feel like I need to complain.

I am definitely trying the damp towel trick, hopefully that will work and I am also looking into the epoxy deal. Hopefully that won't turn into a huge mess.

Thanks again for all the tips guys, I'm now thinking that sanding maybe was not a good idea.
 

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I have divots in new mfg african ebony hardwood just installed. 1/4 of pieces have spike marks, rough too, all over the wood. No pattern just What causes this from the mfg. ? ruins the look i think. What can I do?
 

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Ok,I've done the math.If a 100 pound person puts all their weight on just the heel for an instant it would of course be 100 ponds per square inch.A 1/4" square heel would be 1600 pounds per square inch.If it was 1/4" round heel it would be more.It doesnt look good for wood floors.:no:
 

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Why not just remove the dents?

Get a couple of cotton dish towels, the non terry cloth kind. Cloth diapers not pre-fold will work also.

Get the towels wet, wring them out so that they are damp. Fold the towel in half and put it over the dent. Then take an clothes iron (NOT a mangle) and iron the towel. The steam and heat should cause the dent to pop out.

For extreme dents, put a drop of water in the dent and allow it to sit for 5 minutes and then iron as above.

You'll be pleasantly surprised.

Oh, in the future buy solid wood pre-stressed flooring. Don't get fooled by bamboo either. A friend's 90 pound dog put all kinds of dents in the floor just by walking on the floor. The dog was an older dog so she wasn't a wild puppy.
 

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Don't a lot of those type floors have a long warranty against wear? One that advertises 50 year warranty? Bellawood or ? Anyway, I realize this may be a warranty voider but perhaps not? It's not like she was driving a fork lift in the kitchen. What do you guys think?
 

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any ideas anyone "cmon guys" help a brother out

Surely you aged experts can give me some ideas. What causes divots, small tiny holes in Ebony Hardwood mfg wood from the supplier. My bldr had installed in new home. Inspector on the way. What causes this? The model doesnt have them on the same floor. Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks
 
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