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Hello Steve,

I do not disagree now, nor in my last statement that Aaron's floor is "wrong" per se, yet rather on a spectrum. You have just made my point for me regarding this. Because of that spectrum, what I stated, is very much true in all areas, regardless of who is installing the floor.

The..."fact of the matter"...is that just because modern floor contractors are laying floors a certain way, is thus, not indicative that what they are doing is necessarily best practice within the spectrum of the craft. All it reflects is, very simply, what they have chosen to do within there area. This leaves the archtiecture (and clients) with...such as in the case with the OP Aaron...a question in how to proceed with a change or repair...

You (personally) can state that something is "not worth the effort," and I would be foolish to debate that. Its your prerogative to feel thus. However, it does not reflect the historic record, and means, method and materials comparatively have absolutely nothing to do with it. We lay floors as quick (often quicker) with tradtional modalities than modern floor contractors do with nail guns and sheet goods. Its a choice...not a practice issue.

As such, the modern flooring contractors are not very often following "best practice" and on jobs I'm part of, such details would be consider a lower grade installation (perhaps in good effort) to meet budgetary constraints on a project, yet on many it would be considered unacceptable practice by the project facilitator.

Again, its a spectrum...
I don't see the difference. Either way would yield the same results. As long as the floor stays down the method doesn't matter.
 

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I don't see the difference. Either way would yield the same results. As long as the floor stays down the method doesn't matter.
Having had this conversation with many General Contractors, Woodworkers and the related over the decades, that have either adopted "only" contemporary practices and/or choose not to see past them, I fully understand your viewpoint. They often clearly voice not "seeing the difference,"...or...they choose not to see beyond it. Either way, I can't debate or disagree with there perspective at all. Its their truth...

As to "the method doesn't matter," that I can't agree with at all. Just like a modern plastic finish will never yield an acient patina, because it is not of a nature to do so...I have little doubt in my mind (or in my experience over the decades) that the floors laid today will not endure the centuries as well as the floors I see countless examples of that have...

Again, its a spectrum, where upon it we as practitioners of craft are inclined to be, is up to us all individually...

I personally have chosen the path of those before me as it seems to clearly reflect a more enduring form of the craft...
 

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Hello Everyone,

Actually I renovate my house & need suggestion for wood flooring. I choose bamboo flooring for my house.
How much cost will I pay for installation?
Thanks...
 

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As long as this discussion is on the radar...

I'm renovating a room in the rear of my own home which has deteriorated parquet wood flooring, about 3/8" thick tiles. I'd like to rip it out and replace it with conventional hardwood flooring. What thicknesses is hardwood flooring available in? I'm framing in a new door for the room and I want to make sure that I set it at a proper height for the new flooring.
 

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Ideas and things change over a short period of time. Maybe you should wait till new floor is in place before framing the door?
 

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Hello Everyone,

Actually I renovate my house & need suggestion for wood flooring. I choose bamboo flooring for my house.
How much cost will I pay for installation?
Thanks...
I can't answer the cost question, but I can share the experience of a close family member who paid an experienced professional contractor to install a bamboo floor in their home. It was a disaster. The floor was not installed correctly. The boards started to curl almost immediately, and within a few months many parts of the floor were so bad they became a dangerous tripping hazard. The entire floor had raised ridges from the curled boards.

The family member checked out the contractor before the signing the contract, of course. The contractor was bonded. Unfortunately, the bond insurance expired in the middle of the job. The contractor did not renew the bond and didn't tell anyone. The contractor died soon after, and my family member was faced with the awful choice of suing the contractor's estate. Doing that would have thrown the widow and small children out of their home, so my family member took the loss. They hired another contractor, who replaced most (all?) of the floor. The second bamboo floor was better.

Be careful. It isn't always about cost.
 
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