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What kind of finish are you looking for? Are you treating with oil to make the figure show? I just used BLO and that worked to bring the figure out. I then tried a water based poly and that failed miserably. I am now going to strip and BLO it again then find a oil poly that will not interact. I used Enrich from the hardware store. Don't use it. I should have been able to finish over the dried BLO the first coat did the second coat peeled. So there you have it a do and don't. BLO dried with a wax finish looks nice as long as you are not looking for bright and shiny.
 

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BLO is good but I also like shellac. A table I am working on right now I used a light wash of mahogany brown followed by BLO and top coated with Blonde shellac. It is a little light for our house so I am going to add a couple of coats of garnet shellac next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't want to hide the natural look of the wood. I want a kind of high gloss almost glass like finish I've been watching videos on YouTube and have found a couple good ways to get the finish that I'm looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
4reel said:
What kind of finish are you looking for? Are you treating with oil to make the figure show? I just used BLO and that worked to bring the figure out. I then tried a water based poly and that failed miserably. I am now going to strip and BLO it again then find a oil poly that will not interact. I used Enrich from the hardware store. Don't use it. I should have been able to finish over the dried BLO the first coat did the second coat peeled. So there you have it a do and don't. BLO dried with a wax finish looks nice as long as you are not looking for bright and shiny.
What is BLO?
 

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What is BLO?
I came pretty close to asking that question once myself and I've been finishing for 40 years. BLO is short for boiled linseed oil. It must the text message age where everything has to be abbreviated.

As far as finishing your maple the easiest finish if you have the means of spraying is to seal with a vinyl sealer and topcoat with a cab-acrylic lacquer. The important thing with light colored woods is to use a finish that won't yellow over time. Another finish that would remain clear is a water based polyurethane. It would also be a better choice if you are brushing the finish. A lot of people like to use linseed oil on maple to make the grain pop (show up more) before topcoating with a film coating. If you do use linseed oil with water based polyurethane I would recommend letting the linseed oil dry overnight and then use zinsser sealcoat as a barrier coat before the poly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve Neul said:
I came pretty close to asking that question once myself and I've been finishing for 40 years. BLO is short for boiled linseed oil. It must the text message age where everything has to be abbreviated.

As far as finishing your maple the easiest finish if you have the means of spraying is to seal with a vinyl sealer and topcoat with a cab-acrylic lacquer. The important thing with light colored woods is to use a finish that won't yellow over time. Another finish that would remain clear is a water based polyurethane. It would also be a better choice if you are brushing the finish. A lot of people like to use linseed oil on maple to make the grain pop (show up more) before topcoating with a film coating. If you do use linseed oil with water based polyurethane I would recommend letting the linseed oil dry overnight and then use zinsser sealcoat as a barrier coat before the poly.
So I really like your suggestions on finishing my box but I'm just a little confused. I've never really gotten into using base coats sealer coats and top coats. I really like the idea of using the linseed oil to make it pop. What would the proper steps be to do finish it. Like what would I use as a base, sealer and top coat.

Thanks for all the help and suggestions. I'm kind of new to doing wood working on a serious level and I'm just trying to learn as much as possible.
 

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So I really like your suggestions on finishing my box but I'm just a little confused. I've never really gotten into using base coats sealer coats and top coats. I really like the idea of using the linseed oil to make it pop. What would the proper steps be to do finish it. Like what would I use as a base, sealer and top coat.

Thanks for all the help and suggestions. I'm kind of new to doing wood working on a serious level and I'm just trying to learn as much as possible.
Sealers are normally use because they are easier to sand between coats than the harder finish. Think of sealers as clear primer. you seal it and sand between coats until you get the surface nice and smooth and then you put the topcoat on.

If you were using cab-acrylic lacquer, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry for about three hours. Then spray a coat with a vinyl sealer and let dry according to the specifications on the brand you are using, (normally an hour) then lightly sand it with 220 grit sand paper and spray another coat of vinyl sealer on and when dry sand it a little better. While you are sanding rub your hands over it and sand it until it feels smooth. Then spray a coat of lacquer on it. If you still feel some roughness anywhere you can sand it some more and then put a second coat of lacquer on it and when it's dry should be done. While working lacquer if it is smooth sanding between coats is unnecessary. Lacquer melts into previous coats which is why it doesn't brush very good.

If you are using a water based polyurethane, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry overnight. Then brush or spray a coat of zinsser sealcoat on and when dry lightly sand it. Then brush or spray the polyurethane on and let dry. Keep applying the polyurethane sanding it between coats with 220 grit paper until you get the finish to the appearance you like. It's hard to say how many coats that would be because it would vary from brand to brand. Be sure you sand between coats even if the surface is smooth. It needs the surfaces roughened for adhesion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Steve Neul said:
Sealers are normally use because they are easier to sand between coats than the harder finish. Think of sealers as clear primer. you seal it and sand between coats until you get the surface nice and smooth and then you put the topcoat on.

If you were using cab-acrylic lacquer, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry for about three hours. Then spray a coat with a vinyl sealer and let dry according to the specifications on the brand you are using, (normally an hour) then lightly sand it with 220 grit sand paper and spray another coat of vinyl sealer on and when dry sand it a little better. While you are sanding rub your hands over it and sand it until it feels smooth. Then spray a coat of lacquer on it. If you still feel some roughness anywhere you can sand it some more and then put a second coat of lacquer on it and when it's dry should be done. While working lacquer if it is smooth sanding between coats is unnecessary. Lacquer melts into previous coats which is why it doesn't brush very good.

If you are using a water based polyurethane, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry overnight. Then brush or spray a coat of zinsser sealcoat on and when dry lightly sand it. Then brush or spray the polyurethane on and let dry. Keep applying the polyurethane sanding it between coats with 220 grit paper until you get the finish to the appearance you like. It's hard to say how many coats that would be because it would vary from brand to brand. Be sure you sand between coats even if the surface is smooth. It needs the surfaces roughened for adhesion.
Ok cool thanks. Again thanks for all the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Steve Neul said:
Sealers are normally use because they are easier to sand between coats than the harder finish. Think of sealers as clear primer. you seal it and sand between coats until you get the surface nice and smooth and then you put the topcoat on.

If you were using cab-acrylic lacquer, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry for about three hours. Then spray a coat with a vinyl sealer and let dry according to the specifications on the brand you are using, (normally an hour) then lightly sand it with 220 grit sand paper and spray another coat of vinyl sealer on and when dry sand it a little better. While you are sanding rub your hands over it and sand it until it feels smooth. Then spray a coat of lacquer on it. If you still feel some roughness anywhere you can sand it some more and then put a second coat of lacquer on it and when it's dry should be done. While working lacquer if it is smooth sanding between coats is unnecessary. Lacquer melts into previous coats which is why it doesn't brush very good.

If you are using a water based polyurethane, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry overnight. Then brush or spray a coat of zinsser sealcoat on and when dry lightly sand it. Then brush or spray the polyurethane on and let dry. Keep applying the polyurethane sanding it between coats with 220 grit paper until you get the finish to the appearance you like. It's hard to say how many coats that would be because it would vary from brand to brand. Be sure you sand between coats even if the surface is smooth. It needs the surfaces roughened for adhesion.
For the water based polyurethane application. You said to use zinsser seal coat after applying the BLO and before using the poly. The only zinsser sealer I was able to find was a clear shalck. Is that what you where referring to or something else. Or is it ok to just use the BLO with the poly, will I still get the same result?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Steve Neul said:
Sealers are normally use because they are easier to sand between coats than the harder finish. Think of sealers as clear primer. you seal it and sand between coats until you get the surface nice and smooth and then you put the topcoat on.

If you were using cab-acrylic lacquer, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry for about three hours. Then spray a coat with a vinyl sealer and let dry according to the specifications on the brand you are using, (normally an hour) then lightly sand it with 220 grit sand paper and spray another coat of vinyl sealer on and when dry sand it a little better. While you are sanding rub your hands over it and sand it until it feels smooth. Then spray a coat of lacquer on it. If you still feel some roughness anywhere you can sand it some more and then put a second coat of lacquer on it and when it's dry should be done. While working lacquer if it is smooth sanding between coats is unnecessary. Lacquer melts into previous coats which is why it doesn't brush very good.

If you are using a water based polyurethane, first coat the wood with linseed oil and let dry overnight. Then brush or spray a coat of zinsser sealcoat on and when dry lightly sand it. Then brush or spray the polyurethane on and let dry. Keep applying the polyurethane sanding it between coats with 220 grit paper until you get the finish to the appearance you like. It's hard to say how many coats that would be because it would vary from brand to brand. Be sure you sand between coats even if the surface is smooth. It needs the surfaces roughened for adhesion.
For the water based polyurethane application. You said to use zinsser seal coat after applying the BLO and before using the poly. The only zinsser sealer I was able to find was a clear shalck. Is that what you where referring to or something else. Or is it ok to just use the BLO with the poly, will I still get the sa
 

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Shellac and Sealcoat are both shellac. The problem is polyurethane by nature has adhesion problems even going over polyurethane. Standard shellac is a natural product secreted by the lac bug and has a wax content. Because of this wax content polyurethane just won't adhere to standard shellac. It will peal off. The solution is they process the shellac more and filter the wax out of it and this de-waxed shellac is what Zinsser Sealcoat is. Whether you use an oil based or water based polyurethane it just won't stick to standard shellac so Sealcoat is recommended for polyurethane.

An oil based varnish or lacquer will adhere to standard shellac. In the old days when many houses had pine wall paneling, painters coated the knots with shellac before they varnish the wood to help prevent sap from bleeding through the finish.

You can just use the linseed oil without the sealcoat but linseed oil isn't compatable with water based polyurethane so the linseed oil should dry for several days before directly going over it with water based polyurethane. You could have adhesion problems if you rushed it where you would be safe using the sealcoat as a barrier coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Steve Neul said:
Shellac and Sealcoat are both shellac. The problem is polyurethane by nature has adhesion problems even going over polyurethane. Standard shellac is a natural product secreted by the lac bug and has a wax content. Because of this wax content polyurethane just won't adhere to standard shellac. It will peal off. The solution is they process the shellac more and filter the wax out of it and this de-waxed shellac is what Zinsser Sealcoat is. Whether you use an oil based or water based polyurethane it just won't stick to standard shellac so Sealcoat is recommended for polyurethane.

An oil based varnish or lacquer will adhere to standard shellac. In the old days when many houses had pine wall paneling, painters coated the knots with shellac before they varnish the wood to help prevent sap from bleeding through the finish.

You can just use the linseed oil without the sealcoat but linseed oil isn't compatable with water based polyurethane so the linseed oil should dry for several days before directly going over it with water based polyurethane. You could have adhesion problems if you rushed it where you would be safe using the sealcoat as a barrier coat.


Wood stain Product Pattern Design Wood




Wood stain Pattern Design Food Material property


This is the first time I've tried to upload pictures so hopefully it works. Any ways. I've already put the BLO on and am waiting for it to dry over night. Would these be the next two products i would use?

Again thanks for all the help.
 

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View attachment 71604



View attachment 71605

This is the first time I've tried to upload pictures so hopefully it works. Any ways. I've already put the BLO on and am waiting for it to dry over night. Would these be the next two products i would use?

Again thanks for all the help.
Yes, that should work fine. You only need one coat of the sealcoat. When dry lightly sand it with 220 grit paper being especially careful with the corners and then proceed with the Varathane. One coat isn't very much of an emulsion and it's real easy to sand through it. It would be much better to not sand it enough than sand through it. You are just trying to knock down a little fuzz at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Steve Neul said:
Yes, that should work fine. You only need one coat of the sealcoat. When dry lightly sand it with 220 grit paper being especially careful with the corners and then proceed with the Varathane. One coat isn't very much of an emulsion and it's real easy to sand through it. It would be much better to not sand it enough than sand through it. You are just trying to knock down a little fuzz at that point.
Ok awesome. Thanks again for all the help
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Finally done with the jewelry box. All I need to do is get a mirror cut for the inside of the lid.


I can't take complete credit for the design. I saw a video from wood working for mere mortals on YouTube and used a box that he made as a rough guide line. But I did change something's up on it
 

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Looks great

The finish looks like it came out great, way to go. The mirror is also a good idea I am not a lover of plywood as part of the design. The mirror should balance the black interior nicely. On to box number two.
 
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